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"Vi har hel kylling til middag."

Translation:We are having a whole chicken for dinner.

3 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/3IRIK
3IRIK
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People who do not speak Norwegian might be scared by this sentence (We have a hell killing at midday).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sean_Roy
Sean_RoyPlus
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To me, it was more like, "We're having hella chicken for dinner."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew_Leif

When is "til" used as for instead of "for"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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It's not a translation of 'for' here, it's just that Norwegian uses an equivalent of 'to' instead (different language y'know). Sometimes, prepositions match that of english, but I would advise you to not count on that (but people would understand you, I guess)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dakota_Marz

Ok, so i googled and found nothing so i just thought of the concepts and google translated stuff to figure it out (so not the most reliable). After an hour of debating this in my head i think you can find out if it is "till" by asking yourself this question "What are we having for ___ (cannot add article to noun)?" for instance you can say "what are we having for dinner/lunch/christmas/breakfast?" which would translate "for" to "til".Also i am pretty sure the noun that follows "for" will always be an abstract noun if the word "for" is "til". I hope this makes sense and someone can clarify, until then I hope this helped somewhat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karthik122990

Will the neuter and plural forms be "helt" and "hele"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Yes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valthrendir
Valthrendir
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Not to be confused with: we are having a whole chicken over for dinner

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boukje9

Since when is "middag" "tea"? Who has a chicken for tea? It souds realy weard

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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In England, 'tea' can refer to a cooked evening meal, which is what 'middag' usually is.

Our preferred translation of this sentence uses 'dinner', but 'tea' is an accepted variant.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josefplatil
josefplatil
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Hi Linn. Did middag ever meant a meal in the middle of the day? Like Mittagsessen in German?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Yes, back when people worked outside from sunrise to sunset having the main meal of the day around noon or shortly after was the norm.

Nowadays having dinner between 4 pm and 8 pm seems to be the most common, though I know people of the older generation who still prefer having their dinner around 1-2 pm.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kminsinger
kminsinger
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Here's the weird part for English, though: I keep confusing this for "Lunch", but "dinner" can also mean "Lunch". My Dad, along lots of older folks still say "breakfast-dinner-supper" instead of "breakfast-lunch-dinner".

So "middag" refers to main meal of the day, without relation to time?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fouadAlswe

shouldn't this sentence be like this "vi har (en) hel kylling til middag" or am I mistaken ,hope someone replys.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nerak605559

Yes, that is totally right;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norwisle
Norwisle
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I second that. Either the Norwegian or the English sentence should be changed. The Norwegian sentence is unspesific regarding the number of whole chickens. In plural it would be possible to say "Vi har hele kyllinger til middag", but "Vi har hel kylling ..." seems more natural, even if it is 2 o 3.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.g.doyle

Why just "hel kylling" and not "en hel kylling"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneCarmel2

Can we not remove the "a" in the translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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Without the "a" it sounds more like a lazy title for a recipe/dish, and I'm not sure the Norwegian can mean the equivalent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jf_cabralperez
jf_cabralperez
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Would "en hel kylling" also be correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dored3

middag is dinner

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vdrjcxjnv

what if I wanted to say 'we have a whole chicken for dinner'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helen456566

Could someone please explain the difference of middag and kveldsmat, how is it on practice? As both of them are translated into my native language as an evening meal, so I can only draw parallel with English, guess that it is like dinner and supper. But what is more commonly used in Norwegian?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"We feel like Chicken Tonight! Like Chicken Tonight!" (flaps arms like wings)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuliMali

Lunch is not accepted, but tea is accepted?????

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

-been a while since i last saw the word ''middag'' and ended up translating this as ''We are having a entire chicken until midday'' lol : D But seriously, anyone heard the pronunciation of the word ''hel'' as iel, as well?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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To me it sounds like hjel.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

Takk - danke! For meg det var ''jel''

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MTCarey
MTCarey
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middag for me is the meal eaten in the middle of the day. The region of the UK I come from calls this meal lunch, Dinner virtually always for us is eaten in the evening. for this reason I feel that lunch should be accepted as a translation

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annaduck81

Middag is the evening meal.

2 years ago