"Morgaŭ mi manĝos fruktojn."

Translation:Tomorrow I will eat fruit.

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/darth10ter
darth10ter
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Why does the word for tomorrow not end in an o?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH

Morgaŭ belongs to a class of words which can function as more than one part of speech. They take the neutral -aŭ ending.

Also "Because this -aŭ is a suffix, it may be dropped or replaced by a productive grammatical suffix. For example, alongside anstataŭ and anstataŭe there are anstat‍ '​ and anstate,[3] but this is rare and in practice does not occur outside poetry.". See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Esperanto_adverbs

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1706

Dankon!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

Because it's not a noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimnice
jimnicePlus
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ok then; if morgaux is an adverb, as my research tells me, why then does it not end with an "e"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

Unfortunately not all adverbs end with -e. Only the derived ones.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hodges.wt
hodges.wt
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Copypasta from a lower comment, though I am a tad late....

Morgaŭ belongs to a class of words which can function as more than one part of speech. They take the neutral -aŭ ending.

Also "Because this -aŭ is a suffix, it may be dropped or replaced by a productive grammatical suffix. For example, alongside anstataŭ and anstataŭe there are anstat‍ '​ and anstate, but this is rare and in practice does not occur outside poetry.". See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Esperanto_adverbs

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drofdarbegg

"Morgaŭ" comes from the German "morgen" (meaning tomorrow), plus the neutral "-aŭ".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/professorsloth

Hieraŭ vi diris morgaŭ – NUR FARAS ĜIN!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MailmanSpy

It almost sounds like the guy is saying "Morgo" instead.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaizinM
RaizinM
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Kind of, but more like "morgoŭ". Ideally, "morgo" has a short final o.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blindcat97

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe he's pronouncing "morgaŭ" correctly. According to /all/ of my research and listening to quite a few recordings of Esperanto speakers, it should have a sound closer to the English "ow." Of course, it's a bit shorter than that, since "ŭ" defines it as a diphthong and not the rather separate sounds of "ow," but it certainly shouldn't sound so much like an Esperanto "o," without even lengthening the sound a hair.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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The recording sounds correct to me. You're the second person who thought it sounded like an O -- which makes me wonder if people might not be pronouncing O quite right. This biggest thing is to keep it "pure" -- that is, in English, vowels move around a lot. In Esperanto it's just one sound.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1706

I think you mean that the Engish "o" is a diphthong: /oʊ/.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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With the caveat that I am not sure that IPA means anything to anybody who doesn't already know this, yes, that's exactly what I meant.

2 years ago
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