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"Norway had two hundred days with frost this year."

Translation:Norge hadde to hundre døgn med frost i år.

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ghayth90

Dag is 12 hours, and døgn is 24?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BirgitAsh
BirgitAsh
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Yepp :o)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Is "dager" incorrect here? If so, why does it have to be "døgn"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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It should be accepted now, although there is a slight difference in the meaning between 'dag' and 'døgn'. 'Døgn' means a 24-hours period, 'dag' can mean the time the sun shines, but not necessarily including night.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Yep! I knew that much, but I didn't quite understand why one was accepted but not the other. I'm glad to hear that it should be accepted now! Tusen takk! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jar30pma23

OMG. I am norwegian and I did not know how picky, picky the Norwegians were in their language. My mother never spoke norwegian in front of me.......... Maybe now I know why???!!!!! It is really nice to have these subtle distinctions..... But.... Really, not for the new learners!!

3 years ago