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  5. "Sie hat Öl."

"Sie hat Öl."

Translation:She has oil.

October 5, 2013

48 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelMaxStar

According to my german bf: "Sie hat öl" also means "She is rich" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2561FIRST

Oil is the bases of capitalism so maybe there's a deeper meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

basis maybe? (Bases being plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

Ja, or 'basic ingredient' would also work nicely, better with an indefinite article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlazingFast

Haha that's kinda cool!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexander.mattam

is this indeed a usage in germany?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vycer

Not that I know of. You would use "Schotter" which literally means "gravel" to casually say someone possesses a large amount of money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

Kohle is common as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

So with the decline of the coal industry and the rise of the oil industry perhaps we are seeing idiomatic evolution!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

@LizzyFarrer

Find an online dictionary like http://www.dict.cc/ - it literally translates to coal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_LizzyF_

What does that translate to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Sapphira-

he must have been talking about you . . . ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eddxavier

Hahaha! I thought of that precisely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaffaelJason

Hey , that is a big mistake Hat means has , öl is oil . Check your german Source


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/str845300

It doesn't prevent ".. hat öl" to be an idiom whose meaning is akin to "is rich" / "has money"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desivy38

Hat can mean is in certain contexts: Sie hat Hunger(She is hungry)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/achemerysov

Nah, as far as I know it doesn't technically means "is"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

Why oh why did the German word for oil have to be the same as the Swedish word for beer! It is simply inevitable that I shall at some point end up telling someone in German that I want a glass of oil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

Fun info:

The Swedish word öl is derived from the Proto-Germanic root alu, whence also English ale. The German word, Öl, however, is derived from the Latin root oleum, whence also English oil.

Pure coincidence that they happen to be written the same!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glamorous_Black

Also Turkish word for "die" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamarth

And the Hungarian word for "he/she kills". Interesting coincidence, I guess...? :D


[deactivated user]

    So we know that in Swedish and in German it is a coincidence. So what about Turkish and Hungarian, anyone?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aseem.

    How much time did you invest to learn so many language? I'm on German 7 and I'm almost exhausted. Haha


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhenning

    How can I tell if the 'Sie' is 'She' or 'They'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

    The verb is different:

    Sie hat Öl. = She has oil.

    Sie haben Öl. = They/You have oil.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liams923

    Could "Öl" be used to mean both oil in the sense of vegetable oil or cooking oil or in the sense of petroleum or motor oil?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

    Yes, it can mean all of those and more.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sayagusti

    yep, it is also used for machine lubricants


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rbelouin

    Is "She has some oil" incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zchale6

    That would be "Sie hat etwas Öl."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fempekie

    How do you pronounce öl?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

    Try saying earl with a South African accent.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zawerg

    Ö sounds like the "eue" in the French "queue"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nnpWA9

    Anyone know a good way to tell 'she has' from 'they have'? -- is it 'hat' vs 'haben'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skrettnation

    Typing "Oel" says I have a type. Can you not replace the o-umlaut with oe in this case or something?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

    Yes, you're right that "oe" is the correct replacement for "ö" (as is "ae" for "ä", "ue" for ü, and "ss" for "ß") , but I don't think that Duolingo accepts the replacement characters.

    Generally, the replacement characters are only used as a makeshift solution if there is absolutely no possibility to type the real German characters.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

    This wouldn't mean oily skin, would it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Sapphira-

    No, because 'She has oily skin' is 'Sie hat fettige Haut' and "She has oil" has nothing to do with her skin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

    I chuckle when I look at my silly questions dated from a year ago ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eddxavier

    I guess it might mean a different "oil". In some context. Don't know for sure.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SethSabers

    probably motor oil


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nameaccept

    isnt Sie with the capital S = they


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

    The first word in a sentence is always capitalized. That's the case here.

    In the middle or at the end of a sentence:

    Sie (capitalized) = you (formal)

    sie (not capitalized) = she or they


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaripriyaA2

    how to know the different between Sie : She and Sie: They ????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

    The woman hat, the group haben.

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