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  5. "Han reiser på eventyr."

"Han reiser eventyr."

Translation:He travels on an adventure.

June 16, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_B

I think "to go on an adventure" is a more natural English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Odin_

true, the translation sounds really weird.

But wouldn't "to go on an adventure" be "å gå på et eventyr"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CestrianEx

I agree. It is very weird. One does not "travel on an adventure", one "experiences an adventure". My translation, which isn't accepted, would be: "He travels for adventure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angeluzfun

No, "å gå" is going, on foot, walking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

No, in Norwegian you 'reiser på ferie', maybe it will be' et eventyr'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathan.w19

Hobbit reference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricGjovaag

Or Indiana Jones?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilhelmTheWise

In a hole in the ground, there lived a hobbit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolineYu18

Eventyr er uten der - Ellie, Up Is this how you say it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinMicha299202

Et eventyr, flere eventyr. ..., why is it incorrect to say he is traveling on adventure?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Leaving out the indefinite article would be highly uncommon in English, even if it's the norm in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celestandra

Why is there no "et" before eventyr in this example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

You'll often see the indefinite article being omitted in cases where the focus is not on the noun itself, but rather on the verb action it makes up part of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnFreder3

Why not: He is on an adventure?

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