"Aro de ŝtupoj estas ŝtuparo."

Translation:A group of stairs is a staircase.

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stecxjo

A group of steps is a stairway, as well. And why not a stairway?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jxetkubo
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English is tricky here. What is ŝtuparo in Esperanto, I normally call in English "the stairs." Stairway and and even more staircase give me the idea of the room where the stairs are in—including the landings. I would call that in Esperanto "ŝtuparejo." Perhaps a native speaker of the English can tell more about it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
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I, as a native speaker, would also use 'stairs', 'stairway', and 'staircase' interchangeably. I wouldn't include the landing though: the stairs opens into the landing, but isn't part of it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
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Now there's an interesting linguistic oddity; stairway struck me as a word I barely associate with "staircase" at all. Looking it up, I find that while the OED makes it synonymous with staircase, Webster's Collegiate (a very American dictionary) says "way up and down a staircase;" and I believe here in New England one only sees it in the context of "don't block the stairway."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiCymraeg
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That is interesting - thinking about it, I wouldn't see 'staircase' and 'stairway' as synonymous. Like you say, someone can "block the stairway" but to me that includes the whole area that the stairs are located in - the equivalent to a passageway except that it goes up and down and has stairs in it. The staircase I think of as the physical collection of stairs. You can have a spiral staircase, but would you have a spiral stairway? That doesn't sound right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
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Your 'stairway' would be my 'stairwell'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
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I agree with Cíat; the stairwell is the vertical space which contains the stairs. (It's where people store flammable materials that result in fires that make the news, for one thing.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
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Noah Webster, incidentally, created Webster's Dictionary as a conscious and determined effort to create a uniquely American identity after the American revolution.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiCymraeg
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Why not a "collection" of stairs?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewgtreantos

As a midwestern American speaker, I would define staircase as the elaborate stairs found in a mansion, or cruise ship. And I would define stairway as the functional stairs found in a college or office building. It is like the difference between a bookcase and a bookshelf.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
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As a New Englander, I'd call an elaborate one a "grand staircase." I'd call anything a staircase that has its own well and has more than one flight - has a landing and / or a turn. Anything less is stairs (which is also the general term) except for a set of just a few, or a set that are outside; those are steps. (I suspect New England housing stock tends to be more vertical than other parts of the country.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n0ot
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For me, the stairs are either a collection of individual stair "units," or one whole flight--E.G. "The book is still sitting on the stairs." This is what I think of when I think ŝtuparo. ŝtuparoj would be multiple flights of stairs, and ŝtupoj would be many stair-units, E.G. "He had only five stairs until the next landing." I've always thought of a staircase as the two side supports that run from the top of the flight to the bottom, between which each stair runs. A stairway is simply the area in front of the stairs--the way to get to the stairs, whereas a stairwell is the vertical shaft in a building containing all of the flights of stairs and their connecting landings. I usually think of this as an enclosed space with many levels, where one can look between two flights and see from the top to the bottom, or vice versa. I would not consider the entryway to a raised ranch, where one can only either go down to the basement, or up to the living room/kitchen a stairwell. I am from Chicago, but this doesn't mean this is how most Chicagoans see it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDeNice1
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I would never in my life, as an English speaker say a "group of stairs!! " To say a group of stairs,there would have to be a fancy, ornamental "multi" lot of staircases that you see in mansions made by people with more money than sense!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stecxjo

The better translation of ŝtupo is step. So a line or group of steps would be a ŝtuparo. The main point being this -- if someone said, "Metu la libron sur la ŝtuparon, mi petas." would any functioning Esperantist who also speaks English wonder whether he or she ought to be looking for stairs, a staircase, or a stairway? More than likely this person would go over to where there was a group of steps and put the book there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kubissx

Why not grupo da ŝtupoj?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kubissx

aro da ŝtupoj* I'm tired.

6 months ago
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