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https://www.duolingo.com/Eva_P.

Duolingo states that you need to practice languages every day.

Eva_P.
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Duolingo states that you need to practice languages every day to learn it. However, I was told by an educator that foreign languages are best learned every other day.

This is because you learn the words, phrases, etc. one day. Then the next day your mind takes the words and "incubates" them so to speak.

Then you continue the process the third day.

Does anyone else have research that backs up that you need to practice every day? My record was about 150 days, but after I completed the tree it was somewhat boring.

I continue to practice, but I'm not interested in keeping a record for record's sake.

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nicolas_jk
nicolas_jk
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You can study something different each day, so that you don't repeat the same stuff every day. So simply saying every other day seems like poor advice.

Spaced repetition is a real thing (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition) and very powerful, but it increases the intervals over time, not just every other day. I use a free tool called anki to learn vocabulary (and more).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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When I was working on finishing my tree I would alternate between days of new skills and days of reviewing skills. The important part is reflecting on your own progress and tailoring your studies to what seems to work the best. Motivation is probably the biggest hurdle in self study. If you have that under control that's all that matters (to me).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pseudocreobotra

There's no need to keep a record. It's just about regular practice. Whether you really practice a little bit every day or a little bit more every second day... Not that relevant. You have to make language learning part of your routine, that's the important part. And for a lot of people, it's just easier to do it everyday than every second day without skipping. Just like it's often easier to eat no meat at all than limiting yourself to one day of meat-eating per week (at least that was my experience).

Daily practice offers you a simple yet strict rule. It makes it easy to incorporate it in your routine without offering excuses ("I learned so much the day before yesterday, I earned two days of taking off!"). That's the trick.

I don't really know about research for either interval but most spaced repetition systems (a method proven to be very successful for long-term retention) start with intervals shorter than two days. Especially new content cannot always be retained for two days right away.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Well, I am an educator and I would suggest daily practice, ideally in a few short sessions. I suppose it depends on how fast you want to progress. We don't try to teach our two year old children new words every other day, do we? Or study math every other day?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CHarrell13
CHarrell13
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Using primary language acquisition as an example for secondary acquisition is not going to help, because primary acquisition uses totally different parts of the brain and operates very differently, neurologically. Otherwise, the above advice is sound.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

My point is that 'I was told by an educator" does not necessarily hold much water. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eva_P.
Eva_P.
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This person was a educator who taught educators. We were discussing language acquisition specifically. I'm not an educator nor teach educators. I have read some on interval learning. But when you continue to learn new material it seems your mind needs time to process it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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If you find yourself bored, then stop and find something interesting and engaging.

If you're not interested in keeping a record for a record's sake. Don't do it. Just don't force it.

Research? I doubt it. Do you need to study everyday? No not really, but ideally you want to be consistent or have a schedule or plan in place that will help you achieve your goals. If your current system is boring or tedious, then you really need to find compelling media that will keep Spanish or German at the forefront.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimmyAustin

After 3 weeks of Spanish, I'm feeling like daily immersion is the way to go. I live in Texas, so I stick to shopping at Fiesta, restaurants where they don't speak English, 1 hour of Duolingo, 30 minutes of vocab work, 1 hour of Pimsleur lessons, and I only watch the "GALA" Spanish TV station. I find myself linking everything together really fast. If I only did this every other day, I'd be missing out or going unnecessarily slow.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eva_P.
Eva_P.
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That is a lot of time involved. I run a business. So, I'm limited in how much I can do each day. I've completed my Spanish tree. So, it is a matter of going over the same words and phrases. I do need to look into some other things for variety. I added German to have some variety, but I don't know any Germans.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Perhaps instead of continuing to practice in the Duolingo tree, it might be more useful--and interesting!--to try new avenues? Podcasts, tv, reading, games, there are a lot of resources out there. The Duo wiki page for Spanish has a long list of resources. If you can listen to something while doing something else (like driving or cleaning), I highly recommend the Coffee Break Spanish and News in Slow Spanish.

Anyway, add my voice to the "every day practice, but sleep on complex ideas" chorus. And write things down! Writing is incredibly beneficial to memory.

If you really want to learn German, you could also try learning German for Spanish-speakers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimmyAustin

I'm an Athletic Director and am taking my Master's degree full time. AD job is 70hrs a week, the Masters is 20+. No excuses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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That seems a little harsh. Let's not be too quick to judge someone's allocation of time without knowing about their life.

EDIT Wow, I'm getting downvoted for this? So if can't devote more than two hours per day I'm simply making excuses? Let's keep all of this in perspective people. We are learning a language to better our lives, but sometimes our lives come first. That doesn't make us slackers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eva_P.
Eva_P.
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My job is transcription. It is hard to listen to something else when you are typing something you are listening to. I also teach ESL as a volunteer daily. Those are not the only things I do. Thanks DanD8.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L.N.A.M
L.N.A.M
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4_yquaMZsU personally I am using this method in addition to duolingo, in my case I dedicate between 4 and 8 hours per day, it is not necessary to stick your nose in grammar books or learn words every day, listening to radio while you do housework even if you are not paying attention train your hearing system to decipher the sounds.You should dedicated twenty minutes a day

3 years ago