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  5. "Jeg har en datter og en sønn…

"Jeg har en datter og en sønn."

Translation:I have a daughter and a son.

June 16, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

Ha, this sentence points out to me how ridiculous the English spelling of "daughter" is. Spelling it "datter" is so... civilized! Bravo Nordmenn!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xeins1

Both come from Indo-European. The Germanic side decided to spell it how it sounds, whereas the English side stayed true to the original spelling. Have a look at the Etymologi section on the Wiki article for "Datter" in Bokmål. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Do these words have a normal order? In English it feels far more normal to say "son and daughter". Is it the other way around in Norwegian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 492

Neither "en datter og en sønn" nor "en sønn og en datter" sound off to my ears, and I'm getting a generous amount of hits for both word orders.

Here in Norway, I think people would tend to mention their firstborn first, regardless of gender. It wouldn't surprise me if there were a stronger tendency toward mentioning the son first in older texts though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valimar

I feel like "aunt and uncle" sounds way better than "uncle and aunt." "Daughter and a son" doesn't feel that off to me, but "son and daughter" rolls off a bit smoother. "Brother and a sister" seems to me a lot more natural than "sister and a brother." "Nephew and niece" is also preferred.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Yeah, I agree with all that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Huy_Ngo

I always thought the words are dottir and son, due to their names. Maybe that's an archaic thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

Those are probably the Norse words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xeins1

They seem very similar to icelandic, which, as the language closest to old norse, makes a lot of sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChromateX

Knowing that there's SK in all of them: ÍslenSKa, SvenSKa, NorSK too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

Why is 'I have one daughter and one son' an incorrect answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 192

It's now accepted. However, 'one' usually translates to 'én'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fvanoostrom

So 'en' can always be translated to a/1/one, although 'én' would be a more correct way of 1/one? In Dutch it is exactly the same, although there it is een/één

"I have a daughter and one son" is however still considered as incorrect, I reported it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

Hvor ofte har du skrevet en med apostrof?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronWarwick

Because Tyrion exists. /s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainSeaweed

When did sen become s, o with a slash through it, nn? Jeg trenger en Norsk keyboard to write this question properly. (mit navn er Jensen).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NorskSpiller

Is it just me or does the second 'en' sound like it's said more firmly meaning one, I have a daughter and one son.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xeins1

I was thinking the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohannadAh15

What's the difference between using dotre and datter in this example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

"døtre" is plural. So you could have "en datter" (a daughter), or you might have "mange døtre" (many daughters).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohannadAh15

Yeah realized that in later examples, thanks!

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