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  5. "An dtiomáineann siad?"

"An dtiomáineann siad?"

Translation:Do they drive?

June 16, 2015

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miss_Ingno

I love saying dtiomáineann. I hate typing dtiomáineann. But if you practice dtiomáineann enough, then you dont need to worry about a listening question where the nice lady says dtiomáineann and non knowing how on earth to spell dtiomáineann.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

Would this be used as an inquiry into their skill level (do they know how to drive) or as to whether they physically do it, or both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Whether they habitually drive. The ability to do it would be expressed with a bí ag clause, or 'can'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImAnAlchemist

Listening exercises are a great way to learn a word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibax

Is drive here to mean drive cars only, or can it, like the English verb, mean drive other things?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

I have heard it used in reference to carts and motorbikes. I don't know (unfortunately) if it can also refer to 'driving' animals - I think that 'driving' in regards to 'directing the motion of a non sentient vehicular mode of transport' might be 'tiomáint' in this instance (and I am so damn sorry about my crappy spelling and grammar). I do think that 'drive' as in directing animals could be different (as in the difference in English between driving a cart and driving a herd of cattle.) I know languages that differentiate between the two. To my shame, I don't know if Irish is one of them.

But I am pretty sure that tiomáint is applicable not just to cars but also to motorbikes, trucks, etc.

Do check on other applications though. Even in English nobody talks of driving a plane.

See what you get for 'steer', 'herd,' etc.

(Or not. Sorry.) '


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibax

Have a lingot for effort! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoneDog1

https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/tiomáin

so, apparently 'tiomáin' does have at least some of the same applications as 'drive' in English.

and yeh, i know it's a 4 year old question with no upvotes, but just in case someone got this far in the course without finding out about these resources, the answers to such questions can often be found here and here:

https://www.focloir.ie/en/

https://www.teanglann.ie/en/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hansperger

Does the verb have something to do with Ship rudders ("Timón" in spanish)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Wiktionary.org doesn't suggest any linkage.

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