"J'aime cette bière depuis hier."

Translation:I have liked that beer since yesterday.

December 28, 2012

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mynameismott

I'm not entirely sure if this applies, but in English wouldn't that be considered bad grammar? Shouldn't that be "I have liked," thus making the French in past tense "J'ai aime"?

December 28, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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You're right, another error. Though in French, the equivalent of "I have liked" (present perfect) is almost always a simple present "j'aime", when a date is given (since yesterday).

December 28, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/Natka01
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so my question is: there is no present perfect in French?

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Many people confuse "present perfect" with a present tense. It corresponds to FR "passé composé" which may be translated as either EN Simple Present or Present Perfect. Both of these refer to completed actions. The issue in this exercise is how the use of "depuis" with a FR present tense aimer is translated into English as "have liked ... since ...." Here, "like" is a stative verb and would not be used as "have been liking", but action verbs are naturally translated that way in English, e.g.,

  • J'habite ici depuis le premier juillet = I have been living here since the first of July
December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Inguin-freyr
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You should add the "I have" to the hints because to me, it just says "I like" and the sentence made sense after that, I did not know about the rule you just mentioned. Or not regard the "I like" as wrong and then put in in a hint that it should be "I have liked" because ... Be nice.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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We cannot do that for a simple reason.

The translation of "j'aime" to "I have liked" is an exception; generally "j'aime" can translate only to "I like" or "I love".

The reason for this exception is the use of "depuis".

If we were to add what you suggest to the hints, every time "j'aime" is used in the course, you would see "I have liked" and in 90% of cases it would be wrong.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Inguin-freyr
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I meant the hint that pops up after you have pressed the submit button, above the input box.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CR.Olivia
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Sitesurf....WOW! (....when a date is given) This is learning "by fire"

December 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/lulularosa
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First, many thanks to you and n6zs for all the care you take of all of us! The relation of the English present perfect to a 'dated' French simple present is clear and leads to elegant translations. But would an acceptable, if more awkward translation, be "I like this beer, since yesterday" - with a slightly ironic shrug?

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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This would be a very specific context and meaning in English. However, the key point here is that with "since + date" or "for + duration", French uses "depuis" + the present tense and English the present perfect (continuous or not).

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lulularosa
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Yes, of course, just wanted to see if I could make you smile. Thanks again for all your explanations and comments.

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/elmanisero777
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why cant you say "I have loved that beer since yesterday?" I'm getting confused on when J'aime is I love vs I like

June 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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  • aimer (bien) + inanimate object = like
  • aimer bien/beaucoup + people = like
  • aimer + people = love
  • adorer + inanimate object = love
July 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/elmanisero777
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Ah I see! Thanks for the help!.

July 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/elmanisero777
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One more question: what about to like vs to love to do something? Like I like to drink beer v. i love to drink beer? is it the same j'aime v j'adore as with objects?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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j'aime faire des gâteaux = I like/enjoy/really like to make/making cakes

j'adore faire des gâteaux = I love to make/making cakes

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wildengel

Is it appropriate to say "je t'adore" to a person you are "just crazy about"?

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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If context allows (ie no ambiguity = no sexual attraction), yes you can say it.

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
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For me (native English speaker) "to adore" has no sexual connotation, just a very strong like.

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Biater
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J'aime cette beire depuis hier = literally translated means, "I like this beer since yesterday." However, this English sentence does not make sense. In English to have the same meaning, one would say, "I have liked this beer since yesterday." Or perhaps, "Yesterday, I started to like this beer."

April 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/cynthetik

There's absolutely nothing wrong with mixing present tense (like) with yesterday. Tenses in English are more flexible than that. The sentence in its original for makes perfectly comprehensible, parsable sense.

November 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
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This is not a blanket rule. Sometimes it's acceptable, sometimes not. "I am working tomorrow" (present continuous + future) is acceptable, "I am working yesterday" (present continuous + past) is not.

  • I liked it yesterday (now I don't)
  • I have liked it since yesterday (I still do)
  • I like it yesterday - doesn't make sense
  • I like it since yesterday - still doesn't make sense
November 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/hivemindx
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I'm a native English speaker and "I like it since yesterday" makes perfect sense.

March 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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It may make sense to you, but it is not natural to say "I like" in the context of a time reference: yesterday, last Friday, January, etc. We would say "I have liked...."

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/darjeelingsavage
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Is there a huge grammatical difference between "I've liked that beer since yesterday" ad "I liked that beer since yesterday"?

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/twiztedfate

"I liked that beer since yesterday" is not grammatically correct and not proper english. Most people would still know what you meant but the proper way of saying it is "I have (I've) liked that beer since yesterday".

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sophieg18

Isn't "have liked" past-tense? If so.. why is it not conjugated in the passé composé?

September 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"have liked" is present perfect, which means that it actually is a present tense, expressing an event that started in the past and that still has consequences at the time you speak.

Present perfect and passé composé are constructed the same way (auxiliary in present + verb in past participle), but they rarely match. Actually, they are equivalent only cases like:

  • I have lost my keys = j'ai perdu mes clés

In cases where the sentence is complemented with "for + duration" or "since + date", the French passé composé does not always work:

  • I have lived (been living) here for 2 months = je vis ici depuis 2 mois (simple present)
  • I have lived (been living) here since my marriage = je vis ici depuis mon mariage (simple present)
September 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/nediva1

I have read all comments and i'm clear about the new rule of "depuis+date" = "have+past, etc"... What i'm still questioning of DL is "why is it asking me to answer something with PAST if i have not reached the PAST lessons yet?" Is not fair... I answered correctly (i thought): "i like this beer since yesterday" (it surprised me to be wrong). I agree with many here that sometimes DL has things translated in a wrong grammatical way in any language! I'm practicing French with DL in English (being my native language Spanish) because it's a way for me to practice both (English and French), and my husband is practicing English with DL in Spanish...and i've seen mistakes of DL in all: Sp, En and even Fr, grammatically speaking and in writting (and also some in pronnunciation). DL helps a lot many times, but some others is confusing! Sorry for my long note (even for some of my writen mistakes), and thanks to anyone that reads it, for the attention. Bye, blessings

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Because the expression does not use any French past tense. It is a present tense in French. Using it with "depuis" (hier) translates to English as "I have liked xxxx since yesterday".

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolineEv868278

Aime is present tense so why is that marked wrong?

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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In English, the present perfect tense does the job of starting an action in the past and still going on in the present time. In French, "depuis" does, and therefore the tense of the verb is present.

June 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Nacho.Danders

So if this can be translated "I have liked..." why couldn't "il pleut depuis hier" be "It has rained..."

September 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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That would be "it has been raining since yesterday". Consider how the use of "depuis" with a present tense verb in French translates to "has been xxxx-ing since -time reference".

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcela104802

I wrote "I love this beer since yesterday" and it didnt accept it. Why is that?

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
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  • « aimer une chose » - "to like a thing" (not "love")
  • « aimer une personne » - "to love a person" (not "like")
January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rahul.rocky

Cant we write i have been liking this beer from yesterday,sitesurf?

June 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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This is a weird sentence but it would sound even more bizarre with a continuous tense, I think. Perception and appreciation verbs are not much used in continuous, so "I have liked this beer" looks better.

Now if you have "depuis" + a date or a point of reference in the past (a time marker), the best translation is "since" (not "from").

June 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Penny1945
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I was surprised that the DL answer was in the past tense, is it usual with the use of "depuis" to use the present tense but refer to the past tense?

August 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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As you have probably learned by now, depuis is used with French present tense, but typically translated as past perfect progressive in English (i.e., have/have been + past participle). So J'attend le bus depuis dix minutes = I have been waiting for the bus for ten minutes. Note that "depuis" and "I have been -verb-ing" indicate that the action has been going on for a while and is still going on. The continuous form (verb-ing) is not used with stative verbs (including "like") so we don't say "I have been liking (something)" but "I have liked...." http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/depuis-pendant-pour.htm http://esl.about.com/od/grammarstructures/a/g_stative.htm

April 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rogancak

I would say "I have been liking it since yesterday" if I just started liking it yesterday and I didn't like it before

March 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Except that "like" is one of a number of verbs that are not expressed in the continuous voice in English unless you are using it as a gerund, which it is not in this sentence. http://esl.about.com/od/grammarstructures/a/g_stative.htm

March 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kinetic_kristen

'Depuis' also means 'ever since.' I translated the sentence as "I like this beer ever since yesterday," but DL knocked me down for it. Is there a reason why this is not acceptable?

September 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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You may not need the insistent "ever since" when the date is yesterday.

September 11, 2014
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