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"The boy is showing me the dog."

Translation:Gutten viser meg hunden.

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tindwcel

"Gutten viser hunden til meg." also worked for me here. which one would a norsk person normally say?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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The sentence shown as our default translation would be more common, but either is fine.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
elilla.b
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Ah so "vise" (< Old Norse "vísa") is related to "avis" (< French < Latin "visum", cf. Eng. "vision")?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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'avis' seems to come from french 'avis', but I can't seem to find any sources linking 'vísa' and 'visum'. And I think you might be confusing 'vise'(verb) with 'vise'(noun), the latter is a form of singing, which seems to be related to Old Norse.

Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/vise#Etymology_2_2

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
elilla.b
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  • I'm thinking of the Norwegian verb "vise" = "to show", whose ancestor is the Old Norse verb "vísa" = "to show", right? (cf. http://norse.ulver.com/dct/zoega/v.html );

  • And also the French word "avis", which cames from Latin "visum" = "vision" (cf. also "vīsus" , participle of verb "vidēo": "seen", "looked");

  • Which would mean that, even though "avis" is a French borrowing, it's still from the same Proto-Indo-European root (also underlying English "view", "vision" etc.), namely *weid- "to see, to know";

  • Which means I can think of the Norwegian word "vise" = "to show" as related to Norwegian "avis" = "newspaper" :)

3 years ago