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  5. "Om tusen år er vi borte."

"Om tusen år er vi borte."

Translation:In a thousand years we are gone.

June 17, 2015

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ntpttr

Would ending this sentence with 'vi er borte' be correct? Why is it 'er vi'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matkaaja420

Correct me if i'm wrong, but i think it's because the verb has to be on the second position in a sentence (V2 word order). I saw some exceptions though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nelmo4

Still don't get it. What kind of sentence does it happen to be like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matkaaja420

http://grammatikk.com/pdf/OrdstillingHel.pdf
It's in Norwegian, but the first page shows it nicely.
'Om tusen år' is an adverbial since it tells when an action is happening.
It could be 'Vi er borte om tusen år', but it's first to emphasize the 'tusen år'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cezarribeiro

Mange takk for det! : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/equis

Om hundrede aar er alting glemt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ntpttr

Could you start this sentence with "i" or does it have to be "om"? What is the difference in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Confusingly, «I tusen år» means “For a thousand years”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlinaK.4

As far as I know... the preposition 'in' in English referring to the time (IN a thousand years) translates as 'om' in Norwegian. But when you use 'in' for location (IN the house), it translates as 'i' (i huset)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noah641782

So 'om' would be 'in'(as in q time -or maybe distance) and 'i' would be 'in' (as in inside)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NJG88

Does this actually mean anything?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matkaaja420

It's a prophecy of mankind and Earth IMO


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HengLok

that's dark. But plausible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Belesdan

it´s rather optimistic considering climate change and everything


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/londoncallling

We will be gone in a thousand years


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

...to distant planets.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NilMarkas

An optimist.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lambda77

And a pessimist entered the room


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NilMarkas

A realist.

Hehe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annaa52

According to a recent IPCC report, we've got maybe 30 years, unless we turn things around in the next 12.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HengLok

what will get us?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fiderallala

Men hvi skal jeg være så hårdt beklemt? Om hundrede år er allting glemt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

I don't understand why this is not in the future tense: "we shall be gone", or even future perfect: "we shall have gone". "We are gone" doesn't make sense in English but clearly it does in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HengLok

If someone speaks this, how do you know if it's a question or a statement?

Om tusen år er vi borte? = In a thousand years are we gone?

Does the intonation and stress change when you add a question mark? I feel the TTS voices make it difficult for me to learn the correct word emphasis especially with longer sentences. Even if I pronounce the words correctly, I think I will sound awkward to a native stressing the wrong words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morboed96

Questions begin with a verb, so it would be "Er vi borte om tusen år?" Just like you would do in English: "Are we gone in a thousand years?"

The only exception I can think of are sentences that are a statement where you aren't sure about if it is true or not. Or similarly if someone states something you are sceptic about it and repeat his/her sentence with a sceptic intonation. Again, just like in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HengLok

English allows you to say, In a thousands years, are we gone?

Or "Yesterday, did you go to the movies?" or "On Friday will you come?"

Norwegian does not allow this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

British English would say, I think, "In a thousand years we will be extinct". You would have to use the future tense, and we don't use "gone" in this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

I agree, the English sentence is awkward and probably not something any English speaker would ever say. Even after hovering over all the Norwegian words, I could not figure out what they wanted as a translation. I put "In a thousand years we are away", thinking along the lines of "away, off to populate other planets?", but maybe I watched too much Star Trek as a kid. I love when the DL Norwegian course uses quirky sentences, since it's easier to learn and remember when things are entertaining. But this sentence seems purposelessly quirky. We're just trying to learn about time units like "tusen år" here. This sentence just makes me say "Huh?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

I'm glad I'm not alone (in Outer Space?!)!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

Is this a norsk saying?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paridhi788527

Why is thousand and 100p recognised differently in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NerissaKis

I don't understand the question: is there a typing error? 1000 years is a thousand years; 100p would only mean to me (I'm English) £1 - i.e., one hundred pence - but that can't be what you mean !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morboed96

I am allowed to drop the "a" in English, right? Because "In thousand years we are gone" was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

No, you cannot drop the "a" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kashhhhhhhhhh

could you also say "på tusen år"?

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