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  5. "Jeg har lyst på øl."

"Jeg har lyst øl."

Translation:I want beer.

June 17, 2015

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaCigher

''å ha lyst'' - på - when using a noun ''å ha lyst'' - til - when using a verb

Jeg har lyst på øl. Jeg har lyst til å reise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miniummanee

Thank you, just what I needed :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stfzzed

I have a lust for beer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ormagoden

Literal translation works way better than the accepted answer. Skål!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

How does "Jeg har lyst på øl" sound compared to "Jeg vil ha øl"? Do they have different nuances?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vildand91

"Jeg vil ha" comes off as more decided and immediate than "jeg har lyst på". Like the difference between "I want beer (now!)" and "I would like/fancy some beer"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

Perfect, thanks! I was guessing something along those lines, that "vil ha" has more decidedness and volition behind it, and that "har lyst på" is more of a feeling or mood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

What about 'Jeg vil gjerne ha'? Is that slightly different again?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunil.Shenoy

How are these two compared with "onsker"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Å ha lyst seems to be exactly like the German Lust haben, French avoir envie, Spanish tener ganas, Italian aver voglia, or English to feel like (or alternatives like to fancy or to have a hankering). "Want" very often conveys decision or demand; "feel like" only conveys desire.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuggetPls

Every time I come across something like "å ha lyst" I always think to myself "man, this is pretty weird" but then I go "wait... that's exactly how it is in French..." Since I'm learning from an English perspective I tend to compare everything to it and forget about my own native language. I tell you though learning Norwegian as both an English and French speaker makes it a whole lot easier. Pretty much every time something is very different from English, it's usually exactly like French. That's not even counting all the words that come from French too. All in all, I feel like I'm in a very good position to learn Norwegian and it feels pudding great.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

I was with you until "pudding".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuggetPls

Profanity filter, courtesy of Deliciae


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Oh, that jammy custard!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TopsecretName

Right? There are so many things in Norwegian that are the exact same thing in german but in english it doesn't make any sense. And I'm always like "wth were they thinking? I mean... (Starting to translate it literally) .. oh.. OOOOOOH" every dang time :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justahumblephebs

Gotta say, I'm in the exact same boat as you: native english speaker and fluent in french is really helping me out with this language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuriaHarket

I've always seen "å ha lyst" translated as "I fancy/I would like", not "want" O.o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBoksha

Coincidentally, "I feel like a beer" is an accepted translation, and sounds a lot more natural to me than "I want beer".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuggetPls

Dette er grunnen jeg elsker norsk, så kult


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanteSonja

And with that, I'm off to the fridge... Skål!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JegHeterKordian

I wrote "I crave beer". But it's not correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

That implies addiction. I doubt lyst is usually that strong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jazgrza

Why "I want to drink beer" is not accepted? Noone wants a beer to just stare at it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TARDISToni

That's probably true. But, there's no verb 'to drink' in the Norwegian sentence, either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kasserb

I wrote I'm in the mood for beer and it no workee


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

du vil ikke ha den nok.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kasserb

Jeg antar ikke.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

How about.. "I have a desire for beer." ? Then I can translate:- har = have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ks.Tomek

It translates perfectly into Polish "(ja) Mam ochotę na piwo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/capoeiraplaya

Can't you just say jeg lyst øl?

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