"Ik eet het zachte, lichte brood."

Translation:I eat the soft, light bread.

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/skjerns
skjernsPlus
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 9

'soft light bread' - like the only bread there is in the netherlands.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyjo77
skyjo77
  • 22
  • 21
  • 15
  • 15
  • 12
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Please do not forget "de pannenkoeken" etc.! They also cover the calorie requirements. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/driedstr
driedstr
  • 25
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5

en poffertjes! en roggebrood met gouda of haring!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyjo77
skyjo77
  • 22
  • 21
  • 15
  • 15
  • 12
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Dat is geweldig! :-) Bedankt.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnafirth

It could be stale, although why you'd want to eat it is beyond me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skjerns
skjernsPlus
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 9

I was thinking more of firm German bread. Like something that does not behave like a sponge.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnafirth

Ah, like rye bread. Gotcha.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisStehl

:(, I was looking forward to darker good european bread

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dragons_fly

Im confused here... I thought that het words had one version of an adjective: zacht, licht And de words had the other: zachte, lichte

But in this sentence HET is used and with it zachte and lichte

Someone please explain

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yusblind

HET is a definite article. All adjectives get the -e with one of those. You only need to remove the -e if the adjective is preceded by an indefinite article (een, geen) and is a gender neutral HET word. I know this feels counter intuitive: you have to identify the word as being HET but it can't be preceded by it.

Anyone correct me if I got anything wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/memimi90

I am already confused!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviPolasak
LeviPolasak
  • 15
  • 13
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

Basically it only changed from Zachte to Zacht if it's not "het" rather een/geen, like Ik heb geen zacht water Or, ik heb een zachte muis

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emmett705338

maybe this is an easy reading explanation:

  1. If the adjective is between the definite article, demonstrative or possessive pronoun, and the noun then it is +e.

  2. If the adjective is between 'een' (or the following quantifiers/determiners) and a 'de' noun, it is +e: *een

  3. geen elk genoek ieder veel wat weinig welk zo'n *zulk

  4. If the adjective comes before a 'de noun' without any article, it is +e.

  5. If the adjective comes after a linking verb, like 'to be', it doesn't get +e at all

SUMMARY: ALL 'de nouns' get +e, EXCEPT if the adjective comes after a linking verb (usually, to be or to have e.g. de hond is groot)

'het nouns' ONLY get +e IF the adjective comes DIRECTLY BETWEEN 1) a definite article 'het', 2) demonstrative like 'dit', or 3) a possessive pronoun like 'mijn', and then the noun (e.g mijn oude huis)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephT.Madawela
JosephT.Madawela
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 1211

you are right. Thank for jogging my memory.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
  • 23
  • 22
  • 20
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 29

I'm having difficulty with intonation. The speaker seems to reach the end of a sentence after zachte. "Lichte brood" seems to come as a stand-alone, or an afterthought. Is this really the "tune" of Dutch, or is it a feature of the voice-production software?

1 year ago
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.