https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d

The Language Confusion

You are about to learn Norwegian (Bokmål). What is this thing in parentheses, «Bokmål»?

Norwegian has two official written standards: Bokmål (lit. «book language») and Nynorsk (lit. «New Norwegian»). All Norwegians understand both, they’re not that different and you are taught both at school. We will be teaching Bokmål. It is by far the most widely used, more than 85 percent of Norwegians prefer Bokmål and most national publications are in Bokmål.

Both Bokmål and Nynorsk have a great variety of optional forms. That can be quite confusing for a language learner. So in this course we have chosen to teach the forms suggested by the style guide from NTB, a Norwegian press agency, which is used by many newspapers. This form of Bokmål is called Moderate or Conservative Bokmål. When you write, you can use any of the optional forms. Norwegian does not have an official spoken standard. Speaking in your own dialect and accent is perfectly fine in most contexts, though most unconsciously adapt the way they speak a little when they speak with people from other districts dropping hard-to-understand dialect words and so on.

In television and radio news and weather forecasts from NRK, a national public broadcaster, journalists speak Bokmål and Nynorsk in their own accent. If they come from Eastern Norway, what they speak is then «Standard Østnorsk» («Standard East-Norwegian»). You will hear that a lot, since this is the most populous part of the country and the part where Oslo, the capital where NRK is headquartered, happens to be.

Standard Østnorsk is what you’ll hear Duolingo’s robot (TTS) speak and also in most other Norwegian classes.

If you would like to hear some other some other dialects you could head over to the Computer-Assisted Listening and Speaking Tutor (CALST) developed by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. It offers you several possible dialects including Standard Østnorsk. If you struggle with listening and speaking, it might be a good idea to go there anyway.

http://calst.hf.ntnu.no/

Standard Østnorsk is also spoken out in the real world. It is not strictly speaking a dialect, rather a sociolect. It is used all over Eastern Norway along the local dialects and some people consciously or unconsciously slide between the two depending on context. In some areas there are more Standard Østnorsk speakers than in others. In Oslo, it has largely replaced both the local dialect and the defunct «Dannet Dagligtale» (Cultivated Everyday Speech).

Standard Østnorsk is not officially sanctioned as a standard, and is rarely used outside of Eastern Norway, but it is the closest we get to the UK’s RP. Like RP has its fans and detractors, some think it sounds educated and sophisticated, others regard it negatively as snobbish and stuck-up. As a learner of Norwegias as foreign language you don’t have to worry about that, most people will salute for making the effort to learn Norwegian and you will probably bring with you a charming hint of your own native accent.

June 18, 2015

105 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

I'd like to add that even though less used, Nynorsk is still used in both business and private life.

In my county (fylke) Møre og Romsdal, most of the municipalities (kommune) use Nynorsk as their official language form, and a large percentage of other municipalities in Western Norway also do. Except for the cities, where they mainly have a neutral language form policy (this basically means Bokmål).

For example, it's perceived as professional to answer an e-mail with the language form of the sender.

Fun facts.

January 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron77019

Men berre som eit skriftleg språk? Dialekten som du snakkar er lik Nynorsk? Viss eg har lært Bokmål, skulle eg lære nynorsk?

September 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

Veit ikkje om eg forstår deg rett, men ja: nynorsk er eit skriftspråk som er meir likt korleis fleirtalet av befolkninga i Noreg snakkar (dialekta deira).

Det er aldri slik at du må lære nynorsk viss du allereie kan bokmål - eller motsett - men det er aldri negativt. Dersom du skal kommunisere med folk som har andre dialekter enn såkalt "standard Østnorsk", vil nynorsk godt muleg vere meir praktisk enn bokmål.

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron77019

Nynorsk er nærmere islandsk. Jeg har studert bokmål så ville det bli litt vanskelig å lære alt en gang til, men det en god idé å studere litt nynorsk. Nå prøver jeg å skrive på radikalt bokmål. F. Eks. Jeg veit ikke, jeg er heime. Han snakka med henne. Han er sjuk.osv. Nynorsk...eg tek, sjå, kor mykje, dykk...islandsk...ég tek, sjá, kversu mikið...ykkur. Hvis du kan norsk, er det lettere å studere islandsk, især Nynorsk.

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Thank you!

June 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raans
  • 2162

Great post, tusen takk!

Standard Østnorsk is what you’ll hear Duolingo’s robot (TTS) speak [...].

Thanks for clarifying this, Alek! It helps a lot to know this.

edit: Is this "Liv" from ivona?

dd2927a3e0

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 299

Yeah, that's our (robot) girl!

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raans
  • 2162

Cool, thanks for confirming this. If I spoke like 'her' in, say, Oslo, people would understand me, I guess...? :)

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 299

You can expect to be understood all over the country, as even Norwegians who speak another dialect and choose to write in Nynorsk are subject to Bokmål and varieties of Østnorsk on a regular basis.

Keep in mind that there are a few words Liv struggles with (read: butchers completely), notably 'avis' and 'juice'. Her intonation is also a bit off at times, as she seems unable to differentiate between indefinite nouns and present tense verbs that are written identically (favouring the verb pronunciation), but I think you'll get a feel for that regardless.

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stigjohan

I wanted to suggest replacing "juice" with "jus", but then I tried it out myself, and she cannot distinguish it from "jus/juss" meaning "law". She does however pronounce it correctly if I write "juus", but I suppose it's impractical to deal with two versions of each sentence, one to present to the learner and one to feed to the speech engine.

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 299

It's not only impractical, but currently something we don't have an option to do. It would require some programming work on Duolingo's part.

What we'll likely do once we're able to start working on another tree version is to remove 'avis' from the course (keeping 'avisen(/a)', which she pronounces correctly), and possibly even remove 'juice' completely.

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceF.

I was certainly puzzled by "avis." Can I assume the actual pronunciation is fairly straightforward, i.e. without that pseudo glottal stop that the robot introduces, or is it something altogether different?

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

My teacher from Tønsberg laughs so much about "Avis" that we find ourselves using Arvis incorrectly, wherever possible, now! Perhaps it will enter the common usage in due course of time . I do find the emphasis on turtles wearing moisturising cream rather esoteric though.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

I'd say it's prett straight forward, but then again I'm a native speaker so it's difficult to say.

I guess you'd pronounce the A as you would say "aaaaaa" at the dentist, although you stress the I (pronounced like "ee" in "teeth") so it's "aviis".

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ingridaliheim

I can`t understand how 85% of us prefer bokmål when at least a 1/4 of us speak a dialect closer to nynorsk. I Guess its the Battle between those from the vest and those from oslo.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Odin_

Aren't most regions in Norway teaching Bokmål as the main written language in schools? Because I assume if 85% uses this all the time in school except in the lessons Nynorsk that they just stick with Bokmål. I'm not Norwegian so I could be wrong, I just assume most people stick to what they've learned first unless they would move to a Nynorsk region and have to adapt their writing style.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ingridaliheim

I`m not sure which regions other than the southeastern part teaches bokmål first, but so many of us already speak closely to nynorsk and it is normal in those villages that choose to teach nynorsk first i Guess..

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

According to Statistisk Sentralbyrå only 12% of the Norwegian primary schools' students have nynorsk as their primary, that is first, language in 2012. These schools are mostly on the West coast of Norway, in Sogn og Fjordane, Møre og Romsdal, Hordaland and Rogaland. 9 fylker (of 19) have no schools with nynorsk as the first language.

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrisBp

I'd say that's true. The thing that they're implying is that a lot of us speak Western (not me though, I speak Eastern) so why don't we use the written system which is closest to our dialect.

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron77019

Eg veit ikkje...

September 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenstf

The duoLingo TTS voice is sometimes hard to understand, even for us native speakers. It sound like a foreigner trying to learn the language. Should have been recordings by a native speaker instead of TTS

March 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

Yes. I think since questions are infinite and computer-generated this might be hard. But if there is a drawback to Duolingo it is that it lacks oral and aural teaching. Apart from that it has taught me well for 18 months and has done amazing things with my brain.

March 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 299

The only sentences that are computer-generated are the incorrect multiple choice options.

Still, having the TTS voice near-instantly added to every new sentence we make is quite a big boon compared to having to wait weeks if not months for someone to record it. The TTS isn't perfect, but it sure has its upsides. :)

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allinuse

Are the questions really computer generated or is it just the voice? A lot of other apps and programs have a real human voice.

April 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

They are sort of generated. But try this in Google translate ( English). You will find that a public school girl from Surrey speaks. "Darling! I really have to do this for a while till Damien comes to take me out".

April 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loladesu

As of 2018, Google seems to be assigning English-speaking accents by geographical location. Pasted the above sentence in and got a godawful broad Australian accent - ugh.

April 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingBoat

It is impossible to understand, I surely hope that the sound will be improved, I always have to slow it down because some article or adverb always gets lost in the regular speed.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mundgeirr

I have another question for the Norwegian native speakers here: What is the status of høgnorsk (the new name for landsmål) in today's Norway? Is it considered a conservative form of nynorsk or it is not in use anymore?

June 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d
Mod
  • 242

Høgnorsk is not an official standard and it is extremely rarely used. Most Norwegians have probably not even heard about it. Høgnorsk is not a variety of modern Nynorsk.

June 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mundgeirr

Tanks for the explanation! I like høgnorsk, it still keeps some words and forms similar to Old West Norse.

June 23, 2015

[deactivated user]

    Woo! Someone else who likes Høgnorsk!

    January 8, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mundgeirr

    There is a grammar in the Målmannen website. It is a far right magazine written in høgnorsk. I don't support their political ideas but they have a Høgnorsk word list and grammar for Høgnorsk if you are interested. This is their website: https://www.maalmannen.no/

    January 8, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mundgeirr

    Exactly! I find it better to have a Mjǫlnir on the flag than a christian cross haha. That way I passively support the addition of the Icelandic course to duolingo as well.

    January 8, 2016

    [deactivated user]

      Thanks! Also, is that the High Iceland flag?

      January 8, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mundgeirr

      Not really! I'm learning Old Norse, but it takes a lot of time. Later I may learn modern Icelandic as well (which is pretty similar to Old Norse so it wouldn't be very difficult), especially if there is a course here on Duolingo. I like though the ideas of High Icelandic.

      January 9, 2016

      [deactivated user]

        @Mundgeirr´s second comment

        So, can you speak High Icelandic? Or are you still learning?

        January 9, 2016

        [deactivated user]

          I think it looks cooler.

          January 9, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ingridaliheim

          True. I`m Norwegian and i was sitting here like "what the rock is høgnorsk????"

          December 10, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/okashipiero

          Mange takk! I do not know what motivated me to learn Norwegian, but it is a nice language.

          February 14, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingBoat

          I am a daughter of a Norwegian father who grew outside of Norway while my father visited and tryed to teach me some words, and now I am doing my father"s and Norwegian family's wish by learning Norwegian. It seems easy for me, I am at level 15 in 70 straight days . I loved to find a resource where I can practice Norwegian!

          March 26, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gremedios

          Thanks a lot for your comment. Are college students in Oslo compelled to use any standard for academic writing?

          February 3, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d
          Mod
          • 242

          No, they have full freedom within either Bokmål or Nynorsk.

          February 3, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          I did head off there (http://calst.hf.ntnu.no/) but it seemed to want me to register for what might be a course..and a lot of other commitments. All I wanted to do was to hear some dialect spoken.

          December 5, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Racine.Carree

          I promise you, it's worth it. Registering is free and only takes a few moments. It's really worth it, and although I haven't used it long enough to conclude of its effectiveness, I can definitely say that you will enjoy it at first glance.

          December 10, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          It is good to a degree.. It isn't a teaching aid but rather a series of examination tests which rapidly get very much harder, and which left me feeling really inadequate very quickly. Altogether a depressing experience.... quite the opposite of Duolingo, which makes me feel energised and wanting more. It may be me but listening and understanding is really hard work . Yet, so often, teachers and examiners seem to place almost no importance to teaching this major part of learning a language.

          February 14, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Gorman

          I like how Norwegian has some organization in regards to the differing Norwegian dialects.

          February 4, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snorisson

          This is great. Until you meet someone from Setesdal for the first time.

          March 26, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          My Norwegian friends laughed a lot hearing "avis"

          March 26, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingBoat

          When the robot speaks "Den" it just murmurs something. Is that correct?

          March 26, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allinuse

          Don't use the Duolingo robot to learn pronunciation. This site is good for basic sentence building but definitely not for pronunciation. I'm Norwegian and I took the "placement test" for Norwegian just to get some free points and I found the voicing really bad.

          April 13, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingBoat

          takk!

          April 13, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peorlandi

          http://forvo.com/ <--- You can use this site por learning pronunciation. The voices are made by real people. You can also download the app for Android, and I think iPhones too.

          April 14, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajbozdar

          Hello Alek_d,

          Many thanks for the courage. Your words "most people will salute for making the effort to learn Norwegian" are a great contribution toward my learning.

          Regards, Bozdar

          October 4, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          I am considering forming a pressure group to save the Informal Form of address in English. A traditional usage in grave danger of being removed by selfishly- motivated, London-based politicians, trying to assert their own view of English over our many regions. It is an outrage and ( if I may so refer to thee) Thou should'st join if thy views are as to mine! New-English!

          July 7, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrisBp

          You posted this to end our debate in the on the other post! xD Bra at den er her da. Jeg har nå skjønt at jeg snakker standard østnorsk. Correction though. You don't say "East-Norwegian" you say "Eastern-Norwegian"

          June 18, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ingridaliheim

          Er du norsk?

          December 10, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrisBp

          Ja, jeg var født i England, flyttet til Norge og så flyttet jeg tilbake til England litt over ett år siden. Da jeg bodde i Norge, var jeg i Oslo. Hvordan det?

          December 18, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noway_Norway

          Great post! Helpful even for us Norwegians =)

          June 18, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ingridaliheim

          Yepp! I`m using this course to strengthen my English and bokmål, as im from Vestlandet (er du norsk kunne jeg like godt skrevet kommentaren på norsk men samme det.)

          December 10, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thelanguageguy

          I am norwegian and I was unable to finish the course

          February 14, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          why is this?

          February 14, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thelanguageguy

          IDK

          February 15, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          I am not sure if Duolingo is as much a game as a teaching aid. It is fine for me, but misses out on teaching "listening skills" , which is a vital part of learning to speak a language. But I should say it is for me amazing really so it is a small complaint.

          February 15, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenstf

          I found the Danish and Swedish courses easier, even if I'm a native Norwegian with top grades in the Norwegian subject from school

          July 4, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

          That is very strange. . Is nynorsk your main language?

          July 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmsIsFab

          I'm finding I speak Norsk with a German accent... I'm Canadian, but I learned German before Norsk, so now that's affected my Norsk accent.

          July 12, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeaRobin8

          I'm also (anglophone) Canadian, and grew up learning french. I am told I have a french accent in any other language I try to learn!

          September 4, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rasclart1

          I'm from UK. What on earth is RP please?.... It's OK I googled it, turns out it's what posh people speak :)

          February 2, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrisBp

          Received Pronunciation probably

          February 2, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rasclart1

          Thanks. Yes, it's what posh people speak

          February 2, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MitchellBe658308

          I'm having a lot of fun with this so far - but the hardest part I've found is that I already speak German.

          Which helps in some ways - some of the words are close enough. But some of the grammar is contradictory.

          The biggest example so far: Adding -en to a (masculine) noun in German makes it plural; in Norwegian, it's quite the opposite, making it definitive!

          And of course, while Norwegian sounds "like you're drunk and have a potato in your mouth", German (at least the High German you learn in school and see on DW) is extremely precise. The opposite of Norwegian. It's been interesting trying to adapt.

          But so far so good!

          February 19, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelPun

          so how does Standard Østnorsk compare with Bokmål and Nynorsk?

          July 4, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d
          Mod
          • 242

          Standard Østnorsk is a way to speak Norwegian, whereas Bokmål and Nynorsk are ways to write it. So they're really different things. That being said, I would say that you can think of Standard Østnorsk as Bokmål spoken with an Eastern Norwegian accent.

          July 4, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelPun

          So in terms of grammar (suffixes, syntax, wording...) Bokmål is basically written Standard Østnorsk? And how different is Nynorsk?

          July 4, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

          It's the closest thing. Standard Østnorsk still has its own specific methods of pronunciation - kind of like a dialect. It is seldom (I'd say never) the same as written Bokmål.

          It's the same with Nynorsk, but in the Western parts of the country (and some more).

          You can think of Nynorsk and Bokmål as written representations of the spoken language. They try to reflect how the language is spoken, in their own ways.

          Nynorsk and Bokmål mostly have the same structure and many of the same words, only different spelling. Example:

          NN: "Hei og velkomen til Noreg! Namnet mitt er Kjell, og eg er trettisju år gammal". NB: "Hei og velkommen til Norge! Navnet mitt er Kjell, og jeg er trettisyv år gammel".

          To illustrate simple differences. Although, these sentences could also be written both less and more similar to each other.

          July 4, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          I don't think people realise how many languages can exist in a quite small area. Kenya has some 50 different languages and Ethiopia at least 70. India has hundreds if not thousands, so it's not surprising that Norway has a scattering of dialects verging towards mutual unintelligibility. Quite why and how this happens is a fascinating subject. As too, is the speed of which an old language can be replaced, sometimes only by order of politicians. The relationship of our language to ourselves is yet deep and complex. People take it very personally. Evidenced by the warmth our poor attempts at conversing in Norwegian are greeted with, even knowing that English would have provided no mutual trouble at all.

          July 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

          Semonje. You are too pessimistic. Nynorsk will have existed even if politicians had not 'allowed' it to. The very many ways of using words in Norwegian is witness to the number of dialects which could not be done away with. I was especially thinking of Hebrew as an artificial language supported by politicians. French swept England very quickly too. But so did modern English afterwards. In Norwegian I have a lot of catching up to do... I might never make it. It needs almost a lifetime to appreciate the nuances and puns jokes and references that are batted aroud so fast you might miss them. But I enjoy the journey so far.

          July 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

          Language largely defines your identity - it's how you communicate with others, and therefore also how others define you.

          I think this is why people take language very personally. And yeah, politicians (or well, anyone with power) can influence linguistic processes.

          This is how I feel my own language, Norwegian Nynorsk, is treated in Norway. At first by politicians, but naturally, eventually also by the people. To the level of people speaking 90% like Nynorsk but still "hating" the languge. It's a sad progress. Hopefully it'll get better.

          July 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

          AndyLowings. I hope you're right! I know the language won't "die" anytime soon, but it's a scary progress.

          A friend of mine (from the same place as me) heard a song today that was in our dialect, and she proceeded to ask me if it was a character from that local "sketch group". It shows that if it's in our own language we might think that it's a joke, or that it's "those other guys" who actually use our language in their work.

          There are plenty of examples like this, but again: I do hope you're right! And I'll also do my best to help it :)

          July 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelPun

          Can/do people ever write or type Standard Østnorsk or any other dialects then? For example in texting?

          What makes me interested is that standard written Chinese is quite different from Cantonese, but almost, if not entirely, identical to Modern Standard Chinese/Mandarin / Putonghua, though can be pronounced in the Cantonese way (because we still share much of the same vocabulary). And written Cantonese is almost never seen as proper. Simply put, Putonghua and Cantonese speakers speak different languages but have more or less the same written language. So I wonder if Norwegian has a similar situation, which seems likely so far?

          And in your example, do the different spellings carry different pronunciations and/or grammatical functions?

          July 6, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

          My experience is that most people write some sort of dialect when it's informal, like with Facebook and SMS. I usually never write anything else than dialect (which is like a textual representation of how it's pronounced).

          And yes, the different spellings carry different pronunciations. Both written languages try to reflect the spoken language, so the different spellings come from different pronunciation - where Bokmål represents Oslo and Eastern dialects (mostly), and Nynorsk mostly represents Western Norway and its dialects.

          Most people in Norway actually have a dialect that's more similar to Nynorsk than Bokmål, which makes the usage interesting (only 13-17% use Nynorsk).

          July 6, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenstf

          Example, different words for "I" in different dialects:

          jeg eg æ ej e i æg je

          and probably some more

          July 6, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenstf

          Nynorsk is pretty different from bokmål, but closer than it originally was.

          The closest spoken language to bokmål are found in Finnmark in the north where Sami people were forced to learn Norwegian. But they have a special accent

          July 4, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobsLassie

          I will be traveling up the west coast of Norway next summer, with the most time spent in Bergen. I am assuming that the BOKMÅL dialect I am learning on duolingo will allow me to communicate with everyone I meet. Is that correct, or should I be trying to learn another dialect?

          August 18, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semonje

          You'll be perfectly fine and able to communicate with everyone you meet with what Duolingo teaches you!

          Just to clarify though: Bokmål is the written language and Standard Østnorsk is the common dialect Duolingo teaches (the way it pronounces things). People on the west coast of Norway generally speak a dialect that's closer to the written language Nynorsk.

          August 18, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobsLassie

          Tusen takk!

          August 18, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsmndnmsb

          nice

          June 18, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Racine.Carree

          "...and you will probably bring with you a charming hint of your own native accent." That's the loveliest thing I've ever heard (read) somebody said (wrote) about foreign accents. Thank you for the article!

          December 10, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bouvetoya

          They say that Danes talk with a potato in their mouth, Swedes talk like they're drunk, and Norwegians talk like they're drunk with a potato in their mouth. Icelandic....just sounds like a cat throwing up tbh.

          December 15, 2015

          [deactivated user]

            And Faroese is the most beautiful language in Europe!

            January 8, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fayd2

            What does a cat throwing up sound like?

            January 7, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HyggeOgKage

            Type in "spoken icelandic" into Youtube.

            March 21, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ingridaliheim

            Everything except about icelandic is true though..

            December 19, 2015

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asjaajaja

            In my experience the importance of the subjective sound of a language decreases the more you understand. So keep learning I'd say ;)

            Faroese IS awesome though.

            April 8, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

            would you expand on that please. It seems interesting but it's not clear what you mean to me.

            April 8, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asjaajaja

            Okay, this is just my personal opinion of course: If you don't understand a language at all, the only thing for you to go by is the sound, the intonation, the phonology, and (sometimes unfortunately) this determines if you "like" a language or if you get interested in learning it. Let's take French as the obvious example, because people tend to have a rather strong opinion about French. Some say it sounds "unmanly", whatever that means, while others find it charming and beautiful. Sadly that's just something that happens automatically... but we should all remember that noone chooses his native language, dialect or sociolect, and we shouldn't make fun of people because of their native languages. But this is just a side note that's somehow important to me. Even saying things like "Danes have a potato in their mouth" is in my opinion unnecessary. They didn't choose to be Danes, I didn't choose to be German. It's just their language, not more, not less.

            But when you learn a language and start understanding more and more, you slowly have more to go by than the sound. That becomes less important, because for good communication you need to listen for other clues like meaning, choice of words to determine how your counterpart feels and what he actually wants to say aaand so on. For example, in Finnish there's the word "pussi", which means "bag". If you go to the Grocery Store, you'll find that crisps are quite often sold in a "Megapussi". When I went to Finland for the first time as an exchange student it was the funniest thing ever. Ha ha, megapussi! Let's take 20 pictures of us with various megapussis at the store! But then after a while it started being a normal word and I said and heard it without the association. So I think that happens with languages in general.

            I hope the explanation was good enough.

            April 10, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

            I feel that your dislike of saying 'Danish sounds like speaking with a potato in your mouth', or French sounds 'manly' (or not) is only virtue-signalling. Such things have truth in them if only superficially. Its not racist.... How we change from hearing a strange sound to it becoming what we know it conveys as a meaning, is however an interesting topic. It has to happen or we don't learn the language in the end. I feel that Duolingo doesnt really do it enough ...perhaps I am especially bad at this transformation but it's a real issue of understanding spoken words for me. Thank you for your nice long reply Asjaajaja

            April 11, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meanderpaul

            I completely agree with you I speak one language, English and am having an extremely hard time getting used to the way Norwegian is spoken in dou. To me it sounds like some one slurring words together and dropping letters. Basicly a rough Boston accent mixed with a northern Maine accent for those of you who know what those sound like.

            I am noticing I don't need to click mr turtle as much any more but certain words are still nearly impossible for me to understand at speed.

            June 2, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingBoat

            Yes, that's my concern, as well, I am pretty good at the written language, but the sound is off.

            June 2, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajbozdar

            This is funny. :D

            October 4, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillP

            Very useful explanation :)

            December 24, 2015

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anjimom

            Thank you for this information.

            April 14, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IdaSofie20

            I am Norwegian:)

            July 18, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lofo91

            gracias

            April 29, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guillaumemratte

            Sounds like good fun :D

            August 22, 2016
            Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.