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"Het hert en de uil"

Translation:The deer and the owl

3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PhallAway
PhallAway
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This reminds me so much of Harry Potter mostly because the deer reminds me of Harry's patronus and the owl reminds me of Hedwig(Sorry this got off topic..)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RhiannonCampbell

Hert could also mean hart, which is a correct english word for deer

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Which already is accepted.

Please use the report a problem button during lessons to report errors or alternative translations.

Keep in mind that "hart" refers to a male deer, not to the species. A male deer in Dutch is "hert" (same as the species) or "bok", "bok" is also the name for a male goat.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sollihein
Sollihein
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Interesting. The word springbok comes to mind.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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"The […] name "springbok" comes from the Afrikaans and Dutch words spring = jump and bok = male antelope or goat."

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springbok

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazerlo
lazerlo
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Sorry, I mean no offense but if something in another language comes from Dutch and is the same in Afrikaans than it just comes from Dutch as opposed to Afrikaans and Dutch as Afrikaans comes directly from Dutch.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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You're right, my previous post was sloppy. I simply copied it from the source I mentioned. English probably borrowed springbok from Dutch as you say.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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Do the Dutch have a "Bok Bier" (like German "Bock Bier")?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Yup, lentebok and herfstbok. See: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokbier

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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Great! Hope to be able to try those someday.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterOnaiy

If hert denotes a male deer, then why don't we say "de hert," since "de" is used for mas. /fem. words while "het" is neutral?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I don't know. It happens in some cases that the biological gender and grammatical gender don't match.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
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You have a fundamental misunderstanding of what grammatical gender is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

Definitely a good way to remember it!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

This sentence gave me the most trouble. I couldn't make out the word "hert" to save my life.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nerdator
Nerdator
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It's weird that 'hert' is neuter, it isn't true for German ('Hirsch', masc.) and Swedish ('hjort', common).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rocteur
Rocteur
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And French 'Le cerf' I don't think there is much logic in most languages but in Dutch there are a lot of rules you can learn.. e.g. not complete http://learnpractice.com/rules-dutch-articles

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nerdator
Nerdator
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I meant that the Dutch word is a clear cognate with the German and the Swedish words, and, usually, the gender stays the same with these. This is one of the rare exceptions (another that comes to mind is the neuter German/Dutch 'Buch/boek', which somehow is common in Swedish, with 'bok').

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MingXiong1

Maybe there was an amalgam between "der Hirsch" and "das Reh"? Or maybe those separated later in German? (I have no idea about linguistics)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

Curious! Any idea what gender it had in English before we de-genderized?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiralaMouse

checks Old English dictionary Looks like "heort" was masculine, but another word literally translated "stag deer" was "héahdéor", and that was neuter, probably because "déor" was. (And that's back when "déor" just meant "animal" - I think it's cognate with "dier".) I wonder if Dutch ever had a compound that forced a gender shift. Wiktionary only gives the gender as far back as Middle Dutch, where "hert" could be masculine or neuter.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

thanks, that's fascinating!!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weltschmerz1337

Is the 'r' in 'hert' pronounced?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It is, otherwise it would just sound like het.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weltschmerz1337

Thanks. :)

2 years ago