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  5. "Ŝia brakhorloĝo kostas sesde…

"Ŝia brakhorloĝo kostas sesdek dolarojn."

Translation:Her watch costs sixty dollars.

June 19, 2015

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

It rejected 'her watch costs $60', and a hint popped up saying 'oops, you left out the word or symbol for dollars', even though I hadn't...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyler-trickey

And then Mazi ate it. (If you don't get this joke, don't downvote)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyler-trickey

so is dollars sort of the monetary system in esperanto? Are there words for Pounds, Rupees, Euros, Liras, Pesos, kroners, etc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

1 - No

2 - Yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyler-trickey

Little did I know that my questions would be answered in the next translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Revilo_N

Ekzistis iam esperanta mono. Ĝia nomo estis "stelojn".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Migranto

Wouldn't this make more sense in past tense? If it's HER watch, she already bought it, so it "kostis" sixty bucks back at the time of purchase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miacomet

We're both selling our watches. Mine costs $100, but hers only costs $60. It could make sense in the present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trezapoioi1

This doesn't happen in any of the languages I know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brunofrra

As far as I understand, the English word "dollar" is kind of generic for monetary unit. I heard sentences such as "The Brazilian dollar is called Real". Is this true, and if so, does this also apply to Esperanto's dolaro?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

Isn't it more correctly a "wristwatch?" "BRAKhorloğo?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

That would indeed seem to be more precise; you should report it if it's not accepted. A pocket watch would be a 'poŝhorloĝo'.

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