"Hvem spiser opp eplene?"

Translation:Who is eating up the apples?

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jayway223
Jayway223
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Beyonce.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitch391

When would you use 'spiser opp' in stead of just 'spiser' ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laura-f
laura-f
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Inferring from my native German I would say whenever you mean to express that the whole amount is being eaten so that nothing is left.

  • "Jeg spiser opp pastaen" - "I finish the pasta / I eat all the pasta".
  • "Har du spist opp?" - "Have you finished your plate / Have you eaten everything? [literally: Have you eaten up?]".

Can someone confirm?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelgeGrenb

Can confirm. Source: Am Norwegian. "Hvem spiser opp eplene?" means "Who is eating all of them? There will be nothing left." "Hvem spiser eplene" means "Who are eating the apples? Some may be left afterwards."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjoerdd12
Sjoerdd12
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In the Netherlands we do the same! So you are probably right ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmalkus

It basically has the same meaning in English too, but we say "eat up" often to emphasize eat fast or with zeal. If I said "Eat up!", I would be saying, stop taking your time and finish eating, or dig in, depending on the context. We don't like taking our time to eat in America :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidolson22
davidolson22
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Its surprising that the meaning is so similar. The languages diverged long ago.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ghayth90

So it's like "who's gobbling up all the apples"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ennxa
ennxa
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She says eplene wrong, it sounds so weird

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertAGun1

The translation is not grammatically correct. The nominative pronoun rather than the objective pronoun is used.

The best translation of the Norwegian question is, "Whom is eating up the apples?" That answer should therefore be considered correct, but it isn't. A correction should be made.

In Norwegian the nominative and objective forms of the pronoun are the same. Each is "hvem". In English they are different. Nominative = who. Objective = whom.

Although the correct translation requires "whom", many native English speakers do not know that. Over the last few decades, a general lack of education in grammar has resulted in large portions of the English speaking population, especially within the USA, accepting "who" as an alternative objective pronoun. Some day it is likely it will be formally accepted. Language changes.

Notwithstanding that fact, individuals who wish to become very proficient in English should, from the outset, be giving a chance to acquire an understanding of the classic usage. Providing the correct translation will benefit everyone.

3 months ago
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