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  5. "Arbetarna litar inte på chef…

"Arbetarna litar inte chefen."

Translation:The workers do not trust the boss.

June 19, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina116

I still find it extremely hard to understand the sentences only listening to them. The word order is tricky sometimes. Do you think it is normal? Do you have any suggestions? Tack :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berniebud

It's normal. The more you hear, the more you get used to how it sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person222222

does litar alone mean something different than litar på?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

No, it isn't used without a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyson565571

Im confused on when to use Pa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

In the context of trusting, it's always lita på. Generally speaking, though, is a preposition meaning "on".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drezo90

Believe in also must have been accepted... Same meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

They're slightly different; I don't think they should both be accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drezo90

But in any case thank you :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/King2E4

devalanteriel is right. They are different.

"To believe in someone" is when you know someone can do/achieve something.

"To trust someone" is when you believe what someone tells you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sadezi

Is "count on" considered too idiomatic or colloquial?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

"count on" means räkna med, I don't think it's quite the same as to trust.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigswedeej

Is there a difference between worker and laborer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes and no - they're usually interchangeable in English, but a worker does not technically have to perform physical labour.

The Swedish arbetare does not have any such connotation, though - it could be anybody performing some kind of job. If we translate that to "labourer" we definitely miss that point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vesa29985

Is there a difference between employee and worker?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, we use anställd for the former. Although there's some overlap in practice, just as in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaharKamal11

What's different between Don't and Do not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

There is no difference - "don't" is just a contraction of "do not".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Smous03

Would "Arbetarna tror chefen inte" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Arguably, but it's extremely unidiomatic, to the point of being unacceptable. Most natives would probably consider it ungrammatical, even.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/viv1kk

Is this also correct to say _

Arbetarna har inte litar på chefen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, that doesn't work at all. What English source sentence did you have in mind?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayseaeatsstars

I think they mean to say "the workers have no trust for the boss", but it was said in swedish incorrectly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Ah, thanks - that makes sense! We'd say Arbetarna har inget förtroende för chefen in that case. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yvette013

Why is 'the chef' not a correct translation of 'chefen'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

A chef in English works in kitchen. A chef in Swedish is a manager.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmMagic15

Would it be right to say "the workers do not trust THEIR boss/sin chef" or do you need to say "the boss" instead of "their boss"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

We do accept "their" as well, yes.

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