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  5. "I have a daughter and a son."

"I have a daughter and a son."

Translation:Jeg har en datter og en sønn.

June 20, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oulenz

Should also accept jeg har ei datter og en sønn (considered a typo so I can't report directly)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 306

This should've been accepted. You can make a report without having a typo by the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oulenz

It was tolerated as 'almost correct' with a typo, in that case there is no way to report as "this sentence should have been accepted"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 306

You can always make a free-write report?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oulenz

Do you actually see that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oulenz

It wasn't always that way.. (see the comments by Hohenems)

And I don't get feedback that way, so it feels like a black box. But knowing that you do look at those comments I will just do that from now on. But I imagine it would be simpler for you too if there were an option to directly report a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenSonofLars

When is døtre used instead of datter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lkat70

en datter - a daughter døtre - plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jummysums

In an earlier question, I learned that the possessive noun is not always necessary ie. "Jeg elsker sviggerfar" . My answer to this question was jeg har datter og sonn . Why am I incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

You haven't left out any possessives, you've left out the indefinite articles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainSeaweed

When did sen become sonn? Is this now standard usage? Sorry, I cant type the ir on this keyboard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonyhall92

I don´t know, but I think it´s the other way around. Also, fun fact, you can kinda guess which Scandinavian country they are from by their last name, since something like Olsen is more common in Norway and Denmark, while in Sweden Olson is more common.

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