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"Paul is a writer."

Translation:Scríbhneoir is ea Pól.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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Yes, is Is scribhneoir é Pól correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Without context, yes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scriptorcailin

What's the difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The one given above has emphasis on scríobhneoir in most dialects, whereas the one in the comments is the normal for most.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scriptorcailin

GRMMA!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
MissSpells
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I wrote that and it was marked wrong, and I don't know why

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lg72xx
lg72xx
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same here

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lg72xx
lg72xx
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marked it wrong when I provided it as the translation for "Paul is a writer".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

Why isn't is scribhneoir e pol or something like that correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

And since none of these questions have context that translation should be accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjcrjc7313

why is it not accepting "Is scribhneoir é Pól" as an answer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaGilsen1

I feel like there's a lot more variations here ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

I don't understand why "is é pol m'ealaíontóir" is correct but "is é pol scribhneoir" is wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArthurPend

Can someone explain the syntax here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The given translation’s word order is predicate is ea subject. In Ulster Irish and Connacht Irish, this word order emphasizes the predicate — that is, “Pól is a writer” (as opposed to, say, a farmer). In Munster Irish, however, this word order is without emphasis — simply “Pól is a writer” — and has replaced the alternative unemphasized word order used in the other dialects.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DTSFF
DTSFF
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Thank you taking the time to explain this :) From what I have seen so far, it's not the only example that uses or prefers Munster Irish in this course, like Cuirimid ár gcótaí umainn (whereas it would be orainn elsewhere, with the same meaning, right ?) and it sometimes confuses people. They should make it more clear. Anyway, it's August 8th 2017, I entered Is scríbhneoir é Pól, and it still isn't accepted :( I've reported it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasMc17

Why not just say "Is scribhneoir Pol"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scriptorcailin

If you see galaxyrocker and scilling's comments above, that should help. Also, "é" is required with the verb "is," so it would have to be "Is scribhneoir é Pól."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fake67717

Paul should be accepted. Proper nouns like personal names don't directly translate between languages. So "Paul" isn't wrong. Reported, hopefully it will be fixed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Because Ireland has transitioned from an Irish speaking country to an English speaking country relatively recently (in historical terms), and we still have easy access to the original Irish terms, there's a great awareness that surnames and placenames in particular are usually transliterations of Irish language names, and it is very common to use the Irish form of your name in Irish classes in school (though this has probably changed somewhat with the introduction of less traditional first names in the last generation or so, as well as the new surnames introduced by the relatively recent phenomenon of significant immigration). If your name is John Kelly in English, you're called Sean O'Ceallaigh in Irish, if you're Peter Murphy, you're called Peadar Ó Murchú in Irish, if you're Ann Doyle, you're called Áine Ní Dhúil. This isn't really seen as changing your name - as Irish is legally the first language in Ireland, both forms of your name are valid.

One reason for this is that when you address someone, you use the vocative, which lenites the beginning and slenderizes the ending of a name, so when you want to say "How are you, Paul?" you say Conas atá tú, a Phóil? (or Cén chaoi a bhfuil tú, a Phóil? or Cad é mar atá tú, a Phóil?). It's easier to do this with the traditional Irish names, because it's clear that the mutations should apply - it's less clear when you are using a name that either doesn't exist in Irish (Jayden, Kai, Josh, Luca, Kacper, Reece are some examples showing up in recent years in CSO surveys of baby names in Ireland) , or that isn't the Irish version of the name.

The bottom line is that, at least in Ireland, even if you are known as "Paul" in English, the normal answer to Cad is ainm duit? would be Pól is ainm dom.

(Having said all that, people do use the Irish form of their name in English, and you are entitled to use the English form of your name in Irish, so you are quite correct -strictly speaking, "Paul" isn't wrong, but the normal practice is to use the Irish form in Irish).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegRussia

If some name doesn't exist in Irish and doesn't conform to rule "Caol le caol agus leathan le leathan", how should it be written? For example, Robert or Alex. Should it be modified to e.g. "Roibert" or "Ailecs" or written in their standart form?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The short answer is that, I personally don't know of any specific rules - at some point I'm fairly sure someone has drawn up guidelines at least, but I don't have any links to them

The slightly longer answer is that more traditional names do have "standard" translations - Roibéard for Robert, for example. Biblical names have standard translations, and names that were popular during the "Gaelic Revival" period have standard translations, but there are a lot more non-traditional names in Ireland today, and I think there is probably a more laissez-faire approach - teachers are probably less likely to "gaelicize" a child's name in class, but if someone wants to gaelicize a "new" name, you would probably need to do more than just add additional vowels - to do a phonetic "translation", you'd need to change the consonants too.

You can find some examples of the books written on this issue here

1 year ago