Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"La mujer corre y el hombre camina."

Translation:The woman runs and the man walks.

5 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Multiplelanguage

This sounds like the start of a horror movie.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eirajea

It does doesn't it? (>' . ' <)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/engina

dear lord... how many verbs and nouns have to start with C in this course... cebolla, cabolla, cena, corre, camino, cocino, come, camisa... jeez

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich__K
Rich__K
  • 21
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3

Clearly keeping us on our toes

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/priella1

Okay, how we are getting to that spanish rhythm and flow of sentences

la mujer.. corre... yelhombre camina

I love how the language always sounds like a dance.

There is a beat to it. Very pretty.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/risros
risros
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6

I agree. They can make totally mundane things sound like poetry :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benspanish21

The man needs to catch up then.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Who else blew this question because I didn't hear the y after corre? >.<

This mujer voice is killing me with the way she says things. But... I guess it's something you'll encounter in your travels if you're going to be speaking to native speakers. I'm sure as a native English speaker I merge words together as I speak that would completely baffle someone learning English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

this happens when voyels are following, you escape one to make the pronounciation easier.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosBrooks

Yes. I blew that too. Barely heard "Yell" 2nd and 3rd time. They forget we're beginners and although many people know y=and, we just got the word in this lesson. Would have been a piece of cake reading. Of course, it means the same without "and", but I certainly want to pronounce things like a native...eventually.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

yeah no doubt @ wanting to pronounce things like a native ... eventually. It's all so much more fluid than English (some have compared the fluid nature tho that of a dance, having a rhythm) that I have to get used to the words that morph into one another and sort of disappear. I realize that, despite our language being quite blocky and jagged in its pronunciation and speech patterns (flow) compared to Español, we have our own examples of that within English.

For example, I have this acquaintance that happens to be Mexican that I know from this online game that I play on occasion and I was typing something to him and I said "I dunno" and he was like "wtf is "dunno"? " so I explained to him that it's just the phonetic way of typing "don't know" as that is how it often sounds in normal conversation in English. He came back a couple of minutes later and said "Ah yes, I see. I just tried it out. I get it now. Thanks!" so yeah, we do it to them too lol.

I'm glad that we have the slow down option but sometimes I'm too stubborn to use it because, like yourself, I want to train my ear to hear it as they speak naturally.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

I can't believe it but I just fell for this again on a retake of the section. This is like the 3rd question out there floating around that I cannot for the life of me hear the y sound lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShanonPolanco

Why is camina with the "a" instead of with an "o", since they are talking about the masculine walking?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

shanon- the verb has nothing to do with masculine or feminine. yo camino, tu caminas, él camina.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hlgijkn

I think that spanish is a very fast language for very fast learners! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duolite

I think we all know who is trying to lose weight :p

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mr0range

why is it not "caminan"? in some other sentence it was "el y yo caminamos'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ysobelflp
ysobelflpPlus
  • 19
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 725

Because in this case the man (singular) is the only one walking. The "and" joins two separate sentences: (the woman runs) and (the man walks).

In the other case, he and I -- which is basically "us" for conjugation purposes -- are both walking. The and applies to the subject: (he and I) walk.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Florida3321

I learned that when you have a sentence with a verb following the "y" you change the "y" to an "e" since it sounds better. Have I been wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 16
  • 16
  • 190

"y" becomes "e" only in front of words that start with an "i" (or a silent "h" in front of an "i"). It has nothing to do with the part of speech (noun, verb, adjective), it has to do with the pronunciation.

Example: Mi madre es simpática e inteligente.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 1099

Wow! Level 25 for both Portuguese and Spanish! Do you often get the two languages mixed up when using one of them?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 16
  • 16
  • 190

I did at first, but not too much anymore.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 1099

That is very good.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/182315

i said women not woman by accident wtf

2 years ago