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  5. "Det er mange annonser i avis…

"Det er mange annonser i avisen."

Translation:There are many advertisements in the newspaper.

June 22, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CroverAzureus

Anthony, 'there's many' is incorrect English. 'There're many' is an acceptable contraction but 'many' is always treated as plural and 'much' as singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jarl67

I have 'reklamer' used a lot. Which is more common?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

They're both common, but slightly different. "Reklame" covers the straight up product and service ads in the newspapers, but also TV and radio commercials. It functions like "advertisement" in that it can be used both as a category and to refer to a single advertisement.

"Annonse" is limited to newspapers and internet media; (mostly still) pictures and print. On the internet the lines get a little blurry, as "annonser" can be animated, but traditionally the distinction was clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessaNessaJoy

Are these "buy this stuff at our store" ads, personal ads, or "help wanted" ads?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It could be any of those.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isla_Harlow

Why is it "det er" rather than "det finnes"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vildand91

You can use both in this sentence, however, "Det er" is more common - especially when talking about something everyone already knows the existence of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickN

"det finnes" is more like "to exist".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raisage

Is "annonser" a French loanword?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Indeed it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

Can 'annonser' also be used for tv adverts or is it only for those in print?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's usually reserved for printed media.

For TV adverts, we'd use "reklamer". A commercial break is "en reklamepause".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyNorsk

"There IS many advertisements in the newspaper" wasn't accepted when a lot of peopple will tend to say "There's many" would this not be an acceptable translation? It was flagged as incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

It is good that these courses often help learners with their poor English as well as the other languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirkEasterson

"Is" is singular. "There are many..." is correct because "are" is plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osebrand

However it was meant, the answer with the (at present) many ‘likes’ sounds aggressive and demeaning, in contrast to the other, helpful answers. So my thanks to CroverAzureus, KirkEasterson and CJ.Dennis, and I’d be happy if all those people who ‘liked’ the former answer would rethink their values.

(In general, though, DuoLingo is a positive experience, and I’d like to take this chance to thank not only the moderators (the Norwegian course moderator team rocks!) but especially also the simple users for all the positive and insightful support found on the discussion pages.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

"There are" is contracted by most people as "There's". It's still plural. You can contract it to "there're" (as I do when I'm concentrating), but it's a lot harder to pronounce. When you expand "there's" back to separate words, you must match it by singular/plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jwan7777777

I think the audio says annnongser, why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's a French loanword, and loanwords often end up with unexpected pronunciations, based on attempt to make the original pronunciation fit with the sounds that Norwegians already know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffMichae6

For some reasons, "many ads" was marked wrong. Only accepred "advertisements"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's accepted on our end. Perhaps you had a typo somewhere.

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