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  5. "A chicken is not a mammal."

"A chicken is not a mammal."

Translation:Koko ne estas mamulo.

June 23, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Travis_

c'mon, cake isn't an animal either... that should be accepted right? ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColoradoPhil

Lol. I just did the exact same thing. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fkmrspmbpo

Why can't I say "Koko estas ne mamulo"? I think I did other sentences like this and got it right...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauricioBailey

Yeah! I had the same problem. I don't see why it shouldn't be correct...


[deactivated user]

    'couse "ne" should be before the verb. It's not English ("is not"), but Esperanto. Watch the other languages: Spanish: Yo no hablo (I am not talking), Polish: Ja nie mówię, Slovak: Jo nie hovorím etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2527

    It's never a good idea to apply the rules of language A to language B. In Esperanto, we're free to have [noun adjective] or [adjective noun] and we're free to have [verb adverb] or [adverb verb] and "ne" is an adverb like any other.

    Now, if there's an actual rule that makes negation special and thus must always come before the verb, that's different. But if all we have are general rules to go by, then it's reasonable to think that "estas ne" is just as correct as "ne estas".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

    weird how mamulo has the -ulo ending


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

    Not at all weird. Many groups are named with the -ulo suffix. Animals that have "mamoj" to nurse their young are "mamuloj". Animals that are known for gnawing (rodents) are called "rongxuloj." It's just another use of the -ulo ending and is not confusing in practice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

    wow, thanks! Really clears it up


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 2527

    Or perhaps the root word is mamul* and it ends with -o because it's a noun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

    I understand, but for example the word "planedo" avoided the "-eto" ending, would be nice if it was more regular.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 2527

    I don't follow your line of reasoning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

    instead of using the root word "mamul-" they could have chosen "mamal-" or something so that there is no confusion with the "-ulo" suffix.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

    To future readers: See my comment upthread.


    [deactivated user]

      I got one of the answers right but it marked it as wrong.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wilkersonplace

      I suggest that Koko refers to a rooster and kokino refers to a chicken.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ragedragonvii

      I think chicken is an overarching term for the animal, Koko could be rooster, and kokino could be hen. Perhaps "gekoko" could be chicken?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
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      • 2527

      The "ge-" prefix only means you have both (inclusive), not either (neutral).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lettershort

      For some reason, "ge-" can only be applied to plural nouns.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cosmomica

      If "koko" refers to a rooster and "kokino" refers to a hen, what's "chicken?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

      Rooster is actually virkoko.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ponola

      So... virhomo is the same as viro? And homino is definitely the same as virino.

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