"Since when do you use email?"

Translation:Ekde kiam vi uzas retpoŝton?

June 23, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Criculann
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Can I also say "Ekde kiam vi uzis retpoŝton?"?

June 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jxetkubo
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Since when did you use email? It sounds a bit as if you stopped using it, doesn’t it?

June 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AjxojLerni

Criculann's sentence can be translated as the active past tense: "Since when have you used email", which is interchangeable with Duolingo's sentence.

I was also confused about this sentence.

June 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Oceanotti
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According to the rules about participles given to us in the “Education” tips and notes section, I think that to translate the present perfect English form to Esperanto you should use the active participle in the past tense. “Since when have you used email?” would become Ekde kiam vi estas uzinta retpoŝton? I know that these sentences and the original ones convey similar meanings and therefore can be interchangeable most of the time, depending on the context. Regardless, IMO the key here is that they do not mean strictly the same, because the present perfect, however close it places the action to the present time, belongs to the past tense and cannot be translated as a present into Esperanto.

August 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/claire_resurgent

> Ekde kiam vi estas uzinta retpoŝton?

Esperanto compound tenses are "compositional," meaning you can split them between the main verb and the participle and understand each separately.

> Ekde kiam vi estas | How long have you been

> uzinta retpoŝton? | someone who once used email?

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Oceanotti
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I think you are right. Ekde kiam vi estas uzinta retpoŝton? would imply that the second person has quit using email. Now I think that the right way of asking it would be Ekde kiam vi estas uzanta retpoŝton?. Thanks for the tip!

October 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/claire_resurgent

In a present-tense context, yes. And questions are pretty much always in present-tense context.

(The one exception I can imagine is a rhetorical question in narrative prose. "What would happen to our heroes next time?" Or, as Esperanto might phrase it: "What happened to our heroes according to the next telling?")

But a relative clause could be in narrative context like this:

> La doloro komenciĝis proksimume tiam, ekde kiam ŝi uzis retpoŝton.

> The pain started about since when she started to use email.

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/coenny
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what about "kiam ekde... "

November 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jxetkubo
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No, you can’t say this. (Ek)de is a preposition. The time has to follow it.

November 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/stephbutler19

I used "cxu" and got it wrong. Is ekde kiam or kiam enough to signify a question?

September 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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"Cxu" is only used for yes/no questions (or by analogy, either/or questions).

"Kiam" is also a question word. No cxu is used.

September 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/computervirus99

ĉu closely translates to "whether" so you use it for either/or and yes/no questions, but it doesn't work for other types of questions

August 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SMWhHG
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"Since when did/do you use email" always sounds a bit humourous or sarcastic in English - it means that the person in question rarely uses email and the questioner is surprised to see them doing so. Is that what's intended here? Or does it mean "When did you start using email?" or "For how long have you used email?", which are more neutral and factual in tone?

January 27, 2018
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