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  5. "Han har på seg mørke klær."

"Han har seg mørke klær."

Translation:He is wearing dark clothes.

June 23, 2015

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjoerdd12

Finally a sentence where I could use all the extra letters of the Norwegian alphabet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrystleLeis

now to find out what that arrow thing is used for!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avivstru

I think it's to turn the letters upper/lowercase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JellyP2

Do you mean the ø? It is like the ö, like the sound in nerd. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Doesn’t Norway have the highest number of metal bands per capita? That could explain it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raffie44

That's Finland but Norway is probs like in the top 3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cOOlaide117

Can "mørke" also mean "murky"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HairyChris88

That's what I thought as well. A bit of amateur linguistic archaeology - I'd love to think it's a word that the Vikings left behind in England (a bit like 'barn', which survives in northern England as 'bairn').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helena768340

If "mörke" is used the same way in Norwegian as "mörka" in Swedish, then no, it does not mean the same thing as murky. (murky is translated as "grumlig" in Swedish, would be interesting if someone could say what it is in Norwegian).

However, it is very possible that mörk and murk stem from the same root, since both imply something that you can't see through :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie942815

«murky» is «grumsete», so quite similar to the swedish word!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amyhasnolife

It's a good way to remember 'dark' though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginko-the-grey

Oh! A fellow goth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHarr347673

I like to think of mørke as 'murky' which does come from the old Norse "myrkr" meaning dark, or darkness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jokluz

It wouldn't be Norway without black metal people!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RAmnell

What's the difference between klær and klærne?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arne.kaldhusdal

"klær" is "clothes" and "klærne" is "the clothes". The definite articles are agglutinated in Norwegian: masculine -en, feminine -a/-en and neuter -et.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nealithik

does har paa seg also translate as dresses ( verb)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arne.kaldhusdal

You might hear this spoken, but it's not quite correct, or at least ambiguous. If you want to say "I put on a shirt" it would be "jeg tar på en skjorte"; the more general "I get dressed" is "jeg kler på meg" (use "av" for "undress").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colo_Sushi

Is this sentence correct: "Han har på seg et mørket skjerfe"? And what about this one: "Hun har pa seg mørkne vatter"? ( not sure if it should be mørkne, mørkene or just mørke )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arne.kaldhusdal

It should be "Han har på seg et mørkt skjerf" and "Hun har på seg mørke votter". In the last sentence you could also write "vanter" instead of "votter", but it's my impression that the latter is much more common -- but again, there are significant regional differences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Vanter" are actually gloves, not mittens, so it's synonymous with "hansker" rather than "votter".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arne.kaldhusdal

True. Thanks for pointing that out!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Bare hyggelig! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NorskSpiller

Also if you look up the two you can tell that one is mainly leather/ rubber material and the other is more cotton/ fiber material.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colo_Sushi

So gloves that I wear in the winter are hansker and vanter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arne.kaldhusdal

Yes. And gloves you wear any other time of the year as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colo_Sushi

Is there any rule about adjectives in neutral form? I know that I should add "t". But "mørke" doesn't fit this rule.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arne.kaldhusdal

Adding a "t" is the correct rule. "Mørke" is the plural form, however: The word stem, to which you should add it, is "mørk". Thus we get "et mørkt skjerf" (neuter; "a dark scarf"), "en mørk mann" (masculine; "a dark man"), "en/ei mørk dame" (feminine; "a dark woman") and "mange mørke skjerf" (plural; "many dark scarves").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colo_Sushi

Ooooo..I see, thank you SO much <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wesley434178

What's the difference between Mørke and Mørkt ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjordetbra

Mørke is for plural words (klær, like many other monosyllabic nouns in Norwegian, doesn't change the ending for the plural form), whereas mørkt is for single neuter-gender words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickeyelb

So, if I'm using har på seg I'm talking about this moment (wearing, present progressive), and if I'm using bruker it's more flexible (present simple or progressive, depends on the context)?

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