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"Norge har vakker natur."

Translation:Norway has beautiful nature.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Spinara
Spinara
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Would we say this in English? I'd say Norway has beautiful countryside or beautiful wild flowers or beautiful animals or something. (Assuming it has - never been, but roll on Hurtigruten next autumn...)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pyszczucha
pyszczucha
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I think this ferry ends up in Svolvaer, Lofoten, is that right? I'd been seeing many Hurtigrutens coming day after day, when I was painting a barrier on a terrace on Svinoya island. :)) It was in the summer of 2011. Norway is really worth seeing <3

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silverthornfire
silverthornfirePlus
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I very nearly put 'beautiful scenery' but of course that refers to everything and not just countryside.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrsSMBurns

This is true. We don't use "nature" in English as Norwegian does, but there doesnyt seem to be any one easy translation. "Outdoors" often comes closest

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewReturn

Why is "Norway has a beautiful nature" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EN218
EN218
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I guess the question is, does natur mean only the great outdoors or does it also (as in English) refer to one's intangible qualities ("she is good-natured")?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaoloCosmo

at the same time "Norway has a lovely nature" is accepted as a correct answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loladesu
loladesu
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I think someone on the Norwegian team might have confused the two meaning of "nature" in English, if that's slipped through. Nature is only countable when referring to the personality/inner self meaning. The physical environment version is uncountable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hannlinnjos

I think it is because it's "uncountable" . It's like how you can't say one rice or two rice, it must be just rice, a cup of rice or a grain of rice, because rice is "uncountable". At least that's the rules for "natur" in swedish, which is very similar. When you say en natur in swedish, it kind of switches content from woods and stuff to the character of an individual or a thing.

"Han har en natur som tillåter den sortens beteende" He has a nature which permits that kind of behavior

Sorry if it's a weird example, it's just my thoughts on the matter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiriBabayev

Is it correct to use the same word to point out that a person is beautiful?

For example - Du er vakker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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Yes, however it would probably be more common to use "pen" or "nydelig".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiriBabayev

Godt å vite, takk :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sergio.dcr
sergio.dcr
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But, can you use PEN for objects too?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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Yes, but that wouldn't be as common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yayatona
Yayatona
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Why is it "vakker" and not "vakre"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si1vanu5

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/vakker Note: Vakker is the 'base' form, it is used with masculine and feminine indefinite singular nouns. Vakre is used with definite singular nouns and indefinite and definite plural nouns. So ... en vakker jente -- a beautiful girl >> den vakre jenta -- the beautiful girl >> vakre jenter -- beautiful girls >> de vakre jentene - the beautiful girls ***Edit: I notice down farther in the comments that while it is acceptable to use vakker for a person, it is not common. However, I'm too lazy to search for another appropriate noun. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elledhwen

Yes, yes it has! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loladesu
loladesu
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This is one of those times when you're caught between literal translation and best equivalency. "Norway has beautiful nature" is awkward in English (though i agree with the sentiment!). We might say "beautiful [natural] scenery", or "a beautiful natural environment", but in doing so, you're sort of veering away from the inference of the original Norwegian... Ahhh, if only the world would fit into perfect, neat little boxes! ; )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fedec24
Fedec24
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Are you consider nature as a countable or an uncountable noun?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Generally uncountable.

We will, however, speak of different types of nature just like in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertHarr347673

How would you say " Norway has natural beauty" or "norway's nature is stunning"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArinkaLinders

I totally agree!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenlu97

True that.

4 months ago