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  5. "Besteforeldrene har mange ba…

"Besteforeldrene har mange barnebarn."

Translation:The grandparents have many grandchildren.

June 24, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZorbaTHut

This is practically melodic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flpx

I laughed when the audio played. It's like a tongue-twister.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KMax1

I played this audio recording four times in a row just for the joy of listening to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KRVNHGAR

Once I master this language, I shall release an album with this song as the carrier single.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EN218

bingo! have a lingo[t]! Can I sing backup?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KRVNHGAR

I'm a simple man fam. You give me lingot, I give you career.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EN218

have another... I see my name in lights...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agrariana

I love this language so! Everything sounds like music.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukaAlien

If 'besteforeldrene' is 'THE grandparents', does that mean 'besteforeldren' is just grandparents? what makes the 'the'? mostly it's the 'e' at the end of a word but in this case I can't seem to understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZorbaTHut

Besteforelder: Grandparent
En besteforelder: A grandparent
Besteforeldren: The grandparent
Besteforeldrer: Grandparents
Besteforeldrene: The grandparents

Norwegian (along with, AFAIK, all the rest of the North Germanic languages) consider "the" to be part of a conjugation of a noun. A simpler and more standard example:

Katt: cat
En katt: a cat
Katten: the cat
Katter: cats
Kattene: the cats

Or, in general:

@: @
en @: a @
@en: the @
@er: @s
@ene: the @s

"Grandparent" is a bit weird because the base word ends in "er". In that case, all conjugations first swap the "e" and the "r", then append the usual suffix. For example:

@er: @
en @er: a @
@ren: the @
@rer: @s
@rene: the @s

Note that this applies only to en-nouns (I forget the name offhand) - et-nouns behave a bit differently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukaAlien

Thank you, it makes more sense now. It just takes a while to get the idea. When I started I made less mistakes with the plural (etc.) words than I do now, because now there's so much more I have to remember haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalmanButt3

Takk, veldig god forklar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seventwelve81

How would you say "great-grandchildren"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aidanjhart

Bare hyggelig! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roland_M

I also saw family related sentences, where "My" was sometimes added, even though there was no Mi/min/mitt added. Could you also translate this sentence as "My grandparents have many grandchildren"? (When not, why not, when yes, why is it not accepted?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shano01

Is it true that barnebarn can refer to both grandson and granddaughter? If so then how does one distinguish between the two?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beerzoe

datterdatter/sønnedatter = granddaughter (lit. 'daughter's daughter' or 'son's daughter')

sønnesønn/dattersønn = grandson (lit. 'son's son' or 'daughter's son')

I don't know how commonly used those are outside of conversations about genealogy, though. Barnebarn is what I've heard the most often for grandchildren of any gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kulsss

Melodic tongue-twister


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marc809980

Why is barnebarn used here instead of barnebarnA?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel.RC

I guess because it is 'grandchildren' and not 'the grandchildren'.

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