Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/Bird_Brain

Harder to translate from English to Spanish

My sister and I are going through the Spanish lessons together. Once we think we know a lesson, we turn the sound off and go through it again. We ask each other to translate each question into Spanish. By doing this we realize that we don't know as much as we thought we did.

10
3 years ago
5

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

I write a lot of the sentences out in English and then try to translate them back into Spanish. It is a lot harder but is really the best way to practice. Duolingo should have us do that more often in the exercises.

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

I've noticed that strengthenings tend to have slightly more into-target-language translating, though that might be the luck of my recent draws. You could also do the Spanish-to-English tree for extra (and slightly different!) reinforcement.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Gracias, superdaisy. Are you talking about the "Strengthen Skills" section when you say the "strengthenings"? I just want to make sure there's not another place I haven't gone to yet! As far as the Spanish-to-English tree, I went there early in my lessons and found too much I hadn't learned, but I may go back soon and try it again. PS Your icon is cute! Is that a picture of your dog?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Yup, that's what I meant--I couldn't think of the word.

I didn't start the Spanish-to-English tree (also called the "reverse tree" if you're being English-centric) until after I had finished my first tree, but probably could have tried it earlier.

And thanks! Yes, it is. He was very patient when we put the Viking hat on him.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 963

Absolutely. It's much easier to understand the target language, especially when reading, than it is to construct sentences. Keep working at it, it will come. A good technique for extra practice - see if your library has bilingual books for children (Curious George and Babar the elephant are good choices) and translate from English to Spanish, then look at the Spanish part of the story.

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babybluejay

Absolutely agree with this. I actually went to the forum to see if anyone else noticed that 80% of the exercises are Spanish -> English. The other way around is way harder and to me the only good way to actively learn. It's a little frustrating, really. Spanish seems such a logical language, I blow through the exercises really quick thinking I'm on top of the world. Then when I have to actively type Spanish and pull the words from my memory, I'm usually mistaken. I recommend you use Memrise along with it. It can get very repetitive but it really makes word stick.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Yes, babybluejay! My experience has been very similar to yours. It is really frustrating. Thank you for the suggestion to also use programs like Memrise.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
  • 25
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Happens to me, too. And that's a very good technique :)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/volcidash
volcidash
  • 11
  • 8
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Yep! Sounds about right. For a while, it's going to be much easier for you to construct sentences in your native language as opposed to the one you're learning, because it's something you've been doing your whole life. Keep working at it. You'll get there :)

1
Reply3 years ago