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  5. "Ти їси мюслі на сніданок?"

"Ти їси мюслі на сніданок?"

Translation:Are you eating muesli for breakfast?

June 26, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeReaney1

The most common way of saying this in English is cereal, which generally - although not necessarily - refers to breakfast cereal. I'm not even familiar with the word 'muesli' in English.

All of my Ukrainian friends here in Ukraine use muesli for breakfast cereal. I understand that's anecdotal, but i think the program should accept cereal for мюслі as it is a pretty common colloquial translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

Muesli and cereal are different things. Muesli is a specific type of cereal popular in Ukraine.

If I were the boss, I would remove these confusing foods and replace them with some vocab foreigners can relate to. And bring up local foods in a forum post "Hey, let's learn about local foods".

For now, I tried adding these confusing foods to the "Tips and Notes" section (the one you get if you click the light bulb symbol in this section)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ynhockey

Kind of a strange word to teach so early in the tree... it's not even a Ukrainian dish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

I totally agree!

If I were the boss, I would remove these confusing foods and replace them with some vocab foreigners can relate to. And bring up local foods in a forum post "Hey, let's learn about local foods".

For now, I tried adding these confusing foods to the "Tips and Notes" section (the one you get if you click the light bulb symbol in this section)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kraig629574

I've been speaking English for 50 years and don't know how to spell muessli.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gizzard123

"Cereal for breakfast" is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

Cereal for breakfast = кашу на сніданок

If by "cereal" you mean "oatmeal" you can say вівсянку

If you mean "corn flakes" you can say кукурудзяні пластівці

Somehow people use "cereal" to only mean "breakfast cereal". Cereal has a much wider meaning than that, buckwheat and barley and millet are cereals as well, it's just that people usually don't eat them in the morninng.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

Нема за що :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinCampb168596

I guess im not having corn flakes if i have to say that every morning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Why should it? Muesli is just one type of cereal, not the most popular at that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean564934

I found the audio far too fast to understand here. Would it be possible to have a smail version of the same audio, as with other Duolingo language courses?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Unfortunately, no. Courses with actual recordings of a native speaker normally have just one speed.

It does not seem too fast to me, by the way. The rate is about 4.5 syllables per second, which is as fast as the English TTS in English courses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean564934

Thanks a lot for replying, Shady_arc. I know it's because I'm still a beginner, but despite listening to this particular recording several times, the first three words just seemed to blend together into something unintelligible. Very occasionally I find the slower recording very helpful with Swedish and German, if I can't make sense of the sentence otherwise. I hate being forced into making a wild guess! Surely the same recordings by a native speaker could be re-recorded at a slower speed to create a snail version?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Regarding slowing down the recordings, audio does not work that way. You can artificially slice it up to slow it down (a little bit) but the quality deteriorates. If you just slow down the whole waveform, the pitch changes, so it is always extrapolation to a degree.

You also won't hear anything new.

Does your native language allow "y" as in "yes" and "i" as in "bit" (or "e" as in "me") in a sequence or a diphthong? Ukrainian does, i.e. it has not only "oy" as in 'boy" but also "iy" and "uy" (as for "yeeee", you have it in the the name of the language).

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