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https://www.duolingo.com/bbacher

Castillian or South American Spanish?

Which dialect of Spanish does DuoLingo teach? My daughter is learning Castillian Spanish at school, and I don't want to throw her off with this if it teaches the SA Spanish. Thoughts?

2
4 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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No that's not all there is. I've been studying Spanish for a while and here are the differences I know of (but there may be others) : - pronunciation - use of Vosotros vs ustedes - use of the future tense (in SA you don't really use the simple future form whilst in Spain you do) - the use of past tense (pretérito perfecto and pretérito indefinido - "le mató" vs "le ha matado") - vocabulary... (eg alquilar vs rentar, el piso vs la planta vs el apartamiento)...

But 1/ People still understand each other in most cases 2/ If she's a beginner, she won't really notice the difference, I don't think it should be a problem!

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbacher

Thanks for the detailed examples.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

Englishmen speak English. Indians speak English. Canadians speak English. People from Brooklyn, Memphis, Bangor and New Orleans speak English. And with some effort can even talk to one another.

Would you discourage your daughter from learning English until we decide how it is to be spoken?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbacher

No, of course not - but I also don't want her to do poorly on a test because she learned Spanish differently here than what was taught in school. That would come down to her realizing the differences and applying what she has learned appropriately.

If it all boiled down to pronunciation differences, of course that would not be a problem, but verb conjugation (mentioned by Profesor_Raitao) seems like a big deal to me. I know some languages have dialects in which sentence structure (subject-verb-object vs. subject-object-verb, for instance) is different. If that's true of Castillian Spanish vs. SA Spanish, that would be a big deal also. That's why I'm asking.

I don't speak Spanish at all, so I'm clueless to help her recognize a difference when she comes across one. She would have to rely on comparison between DuoLingo and the classroom. But, if she gets ahead of the classroom in her DuoLingo studies, she may have things to "unlearn" once the classroom catches up. That could prove difficult.

I appreciate your comment and I agree to some extent, but with all due respect to you I don't believe the issue is as simple as you imply.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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It actually is very simple. The differences are very minor. But honestly, if your daughter's exposure to Spanish is only in class, your daughter would probably never know the differences. However, with Duolingo, she will actually understand the differences as believe me, quibbling over the differences is a favorite conversation on the discussion boards..

If you look at the comments on this thread, I doubt you will see anyone say that the Latin American Spanish of Duolingo will be a problem for your daughter. Instead, people are acknowledging that there are differences. But, your daughter is not going to get things wrong on a test because she used Duolingo.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbacher

Thanks, yes it seems that even though there are differences she can still learn a lot from Duolingo.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandroR666
AlejandroR666
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Besides the pronunciation of de "c", the use of Vosotros instead of Ustedes (the plural of you) which changes the termination of the verb, something like this: Ustedes juegan, vosotros jugais... But it's important to know both conjugations with both subjects. That's all the difference there is, the grammar, the structure of phrases are the same.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lajoeiro
Lajoeiro
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i think you may consider that there is not one single SA Spanish.... in case of doubt you can go to some "official" webpage like www.rae.es or www.cervantes.es that can solve any doubt.... I don't know the age of your daughter but as a starting point Duolingo is enough, but as a Spanish native speaker I cant tell you that nothing can be compared with speak with a native

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbacher

She's 10. Her teacher is from Spain, though I don't know what region. It's an immersion class, so the teacher only speaks Spanish, and the kids are only supposed to speak Spanish also.

Thanks for your insight.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lajoeiro
Lajoeiro
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At that age she only can be learnt about basic words and sounds. Now in Spain we have the same problem with kids at the same age being teached English.... I suppose the teacher had to pass some exams to teach Spanish abroad, so he knows when a word is only said in Spain or in other countries. Good luck with her start in Spanish study, She will start suffering when she has to learn the verbs..... yo estudio, tú estudias, él estudia......

0
Reply4 years ago