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  5. "Jeg er mettere enn i sted."

"Jeg er mettere enn i sted."

Translation:I am fuller than a moment ago.

June 28, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kokiri85

Does "fuller" sound wrong to anyone else? I would say "more full."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy585

Yeah, fuller is really a weird sounding word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CestrianEx

Fuller sounds fine to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ojosabiertos

Ja, det er hva som skjer når du spiser!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horrorkuchen

Hvorfor spiser du ja så mye? /s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimTroup

I think "I am fuller than earlier" should be accepted as to me there is no semantic difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Severus14

The problem is that the phrase: 'a moment ago' suggests that you weren't as full within a short time frame (up to one hour in the past) whereas you could have said "I am fuller than earlier" meaning, I was less full this morning than in the evening just now for example.

But you can't say "I am fuller than a moment ago" meaning you weren't as full in the morning unless it's just after 12 pm.

I hope I was understood...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pilks7

Very weird sentence though, it almost doesn't make sense. I've never known anybody feel the need to compare incremental levels of fullness over time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HellaHilge

I agree. If you are full there is no space left in your stomach. Like being dead: You cannot be "more dead"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

I often feel full after dinner, but you won't hear me turning down dessert.

Being full as relating to food is not about absolutes, it's a subjective sensation. Very rarely do people physically burst from taking one more bite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TopsecretName

Does it mean more drunk or more not-hungry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pilks7

More not hungry. Drunker would be 'mer full'

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