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  5. "Tá cairéid ag an turtar."

" cairéid ag an turtar."

Translation:The turtle has carrots.

June 28, 2015

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron928

I am going to say this so much when i master Irish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blarney309

Why is the t of turtar not lenited: tdurtar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michellen95

Is the plural for carrots not careidi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I believe carrots is a word that has as many plurals as dialects! In the standard, though, it's cairéid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Curiously, cairéad and “carrot” are both laidneachais in Irish and English — the native terms are meacan dearg (or meacan buí ) and “more” respectively, the latter sadly no longer used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseR397748

Does "meacan" on its own mean anything?Dearg is red and buí is yellow (I think).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acweaver4

Why is it not "Tá an turtar ag cairéid" following the normal structure verb, subject, object?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Note the literal translation of the sentence. There is no direct equivalent of the verb "to have" in Irish, so rather than saying ""The turtle has carrots", we say "Carrots are at the turtle" (in other words, the carrots are close by and readily available to the hungry turtle). "Carrots" (cairéid) is the subject, and "are" (tá) is the verb.

Your version would translate as "The turtle is at carrots" - in other words, "Carrots have the turtle"! Unless we are talking about a sequel to the movie "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes", that's probably not what you meant...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeeWolfMoon

That was my favorite explanation for a 'why is it...?' in the entire duoLingo Irish lesson plan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasKelly2

I cherish this response so much. Massively informative and fun.

Please be my teacher


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ec_ho

why are the animals so smart


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loughlan3

Can you explain 'has carrots has the turtle


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/madelinejo933994

Funny, I thought that Michelangelo was more into pizza than healthy food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KubeJay

No eclipse here? Does the letter T have no eclipse?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoneDog1

Words that begin with 'd' or 't' are an exception to the rule that certain prepositions followed by the singular definite article ('an') trigger eclipsis.

So:

Tá cairéid ag an gcat. (The cat has carrots.) Hence 'cat' becomes 'gcat' following 'ag an.'

but:

Tá cairéid ag an turtar. (The turtle has carrots.) Hence 'turtar' does not become '*dturtar' following 'ag an.'

However - please, someone, correct me if I am mistaken - 'turtar' might eclipse in other situations; e.g., would 'nine turtles' not be 'naoi dturtar?' (and not 'naoi *dturtair' because 'na dturtar' is the genitive plural?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

It s only in the dative (after a preposition) that there is an exception for words that start with d or t. Other situations that cause eclipsis don't have exceptions for d and t.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TellTheSeal

Bhuaigh sé an rás in aghaidh an coinín ....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna423493

Why is there no eclipsis on turtar here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Words that start with d or t are not eclipsed after preposition+an (except in Munster Irish).

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