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https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn

Wow, Everyone learns Spanish, why?

Kreilyn
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As a Spanish speaker, I have been wondering why so many people learn Spanish, being a language with so many accents, which could be a problem.

when I listen to people from Mexico I always ask me why they speak like singing and the same with Colombians. if we focus in the Caribbean we would only hear people destroy the language, for example here in Dominican Republic, it is a hopeless case, as in Puerto Rico. Hey, if you want to talk with a person from these countries, forget about to pronounce the R and S: so, don't say "comer" but come', and never say "países" but "paíse". Ohhh, it's like French, you don't recognize plural and singular in some cases!

Ohh,The worst thing is the pronunciation of the J, you just ask you if you have to pronounce it softly or hardly...well, don't worry about that and pronounce it in a combination of both forms!

OMG, Argentinians!, something i really love from there is the TV series they have, but when i stop listening the way they speak, I want to kill myself!

And something I know is you are afraid of is the use of USTED and . but it does not stop there, remember we also use VÓS, and Spanish people are present with their VUESTRO(S). German speaker, this is even worse!

But I always recommend to those who study Spanish to be as standard as possible! Most of tuorists who speak Spanish always use strange words we (or at leat me) don´t understand, like *"está padre" or "uay" (I don't know how to write that but it's pretty used in Spain)...!

Ahh, if you are Latino, you do not think I'm trying to offend you, because I think I am the greatest Latino (hahaha) and I really love Costa Rica and Colombia, even in Colombia they play that strange sport called "soccer"!

Did i forget anything?, Why do you learn Spanish?, what country would you like to visit?

3 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheDanielle

I can't speak for all the people here learning Spanish, but I learn this language because there are SO MANY different countries and people speaking it!!! even you said it... it is one language which can connect you to so many different people, it is amazing!! Even though there are accents, it is the same language. Also I really like the sound of it :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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The Danielle, I have to say, I agree with you, if I were a non Spanish speaker, i'd really like to learn because of the countries, practically, one just speaks Spanish in America..!!! ahhh, and take a Lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snowfire9

A lot of people in Texas speak Spanish too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Draven1209
Draven1209
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I like ur fellings about this language

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

I agree with the above. It seems that Spanish is spoken almost everywhere, and it also seems to be thought of as the EASIEST language to learn. Not that I agree, of course, but I think that's the main reason behind it. Also, it's the first language that oops up when you start. Just saying. Peace out (^_^)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

The above being the original comment. (Sorry, but my lawyers wanted that disclaimer) ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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I also agree with you, but the easiest one talking grammatically would be Portuguese. Spanish and English are pretty close in object pronouns (mainly), and I say that because even Portuguese is the sister of Spanish, they don't use them like us.

but not many people like Portuguese, so it's more common to prefer Spanish instead. "Ed ecco il dilemma"! You say you don't agree with "THAT"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

Thank you for the input. Tangentially, if you read the second book in the Ender's game quartet, their is Portuguese, which I originally thought was Spanish for approximately five seconds. I thought that they seemed very similar in text and cognates. Anyway, thanks again for the input.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikos-
Nikos-
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For me, Spanish is the easiest language to learn because it's my first language I'm studying (third language I know, but the first two I'm native in) and I'm used to its grammar and spelling and everything. Other languages are now hard for me because they're so different. I have a friend who think French is the easiest!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

I think French would be the easiest if you didn't have to deal with all the apostrophes :).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gcoleman118

The League for the Defense of French Studies strolls in Apostrophes are easy to use and I personally believe server a more important part in French to make speaking easier than contractions in words like "Don't." in English. Like in English it combines words to shorten length and make saying them easier and less bulky. In French this mainly focuses on vowel sounds. An example of " I forget" ,would, start out in theory as "Je oublie." But as both make a similar vowel sound saying j'oublie is easier to say. When the sound changes like in "J'ai oublié" or "I have forgotten" with the "ai" having a long A sound it can't be mashed together and the apostrophe is gone. If any mistakes are made above feel free to respond and correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

Have you been taking extra writing classes or something? Nice reply!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Have you experienced the many versions of English out there? Texas, Maine, Boston, Alabama, Minnesota, Canadian, Australian, Black, White? There are at least six English dialects in London. And Canada, and Australia, and India, and . . . .

Having been in Mexico, Chile, and Argentina, ad spoken with people in the USA from Puerto Rico, El Salvador, and Guatemala, and watching many 'generic Spanish TV shows, and DVDs from Colombia, Argentina, Spain, Mexico, and Chile -- I think you are greatly overstating the differences among all the versions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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"...Black, White?" what does it mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

Black and white means the stereotypical slurring of black words and slang versus "white" style of talking. Stereotypes are misleading. I hope you find this at least slightly helpful! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

Sorry if I insulted anybody with this explanation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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You did not!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikos-
Nikos-
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The differences between versions of English are vast... I live in London and our accent varies even within London. A few miles up in Scotland it's barely understandable!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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I live in the USA which is the fifth largest Spanish speaking country.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRCPanda

I don't have a problem with your language at all, but I've always asked myself the same question, why is Spanish the extremely popular first choice for a language? I like the language and all but honestly there is others which I would prefer to learn first, that is just my opinion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Draven1209
Draven1209
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I think the same about the english.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRCPanda

Haha xD, never thought of it that way! As far as I know English is taught as a requirement in most schools? I can't remember the official title but it was declared the must-have language of the century I think.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Yes, it is like that.... In my country there are two mandatory languages in schools: French and English... hahaha everyone goes better in French, while English is a whole disaster! But most of people don't learn English for pleasure!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

The main reason is that Spanish is very widespread, and has the second largest number of first language speakers out of all languages (the first being Mandarin and the third being English).

It depends a lot on where you plan to go in the world, however, since it's mostly spoken in South and Central America (and Spain, of course).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

...because I want to speak to people who speak Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa
SimoneBa
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It's written "guay" (meaning "cool/neat" in Spain) ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Ahhh, thanks SimoneBa, I always ask me the meaning!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z4CH3B99

I live on the Mexican-American border and round here that word does not mean "cool" or "neat". Depending on its context "Guay" or "Guey" could mean anything from "dude" to "dumb a**".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoryTeller

Well, there are a lot of people who speak it and it's useful to my work... but you know, many languages have this problem (?) of many accents and dialects. Like people from France come here to Canada and they don't even understand how the native French speakers talk because the accent is so different.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Ohh, Rony, Are there different words between the two countries? In spanish, for example, *"diario" has a different meaning according to the country you are!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilippeLaporte

Yes there are. A lot of expressions and idioms will vary depending of if you are in Canada or France. For instance, people in Québec, where I live, I can often hear people say "C'est cool" or "C'est nice" to mean "It's cool", whereas a lot of French people whom I hear would tend to say "C'est sympa" or something like that instead. Also, here in Québec, people will have a tendancy to mumble half of the words and some parts of sentence, such as "Je suis un..." (I am a...) would be said as "J'chui'un" in one go. Nevertheless, I am still fond of "my" variety of French :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Wow, I just knew about "c'est sympa" but not anout "c'est cool", and do you pronounce "nice" like in English?

And It happens something similar in Italian, actually you can say "tutto ok" or "sto ok" pronouncing ·ok· like in English!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilippeLaporte

Well I find it hard to say, but I would say the pronunciation is somewhere in between, but closer to English. It is really a mixture of the two languages and this is present in a lot of idioms and also sentences. Another example is that one person might say to another "Je te watch", with the "watch" pronounced just as in English, to mean "Je te regarde" (even though it will sound more as "J'te watch") I think most of the words which are "borrowed" directly are just pronounced as in English, but sometimes it is hard to say as I am so used to hear them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

Apparently it's even worse in New Brunswick, with sentences like ''Je vais crosser la street'' being used...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/astrylian

I'll be self conscious about this comment, but I will admit that I have the guilty habit of -assuming a primarily American presence- on some websites. I guessed that the popularity of Spanish here was a result of Americans trying to learn Spanish, since it's seen as the most useful foreign language here. In terms of foreign language education in the United States, French also usually ranks second, as it does here on Duolingo. I want to say that in Europe, French is actually the most popular foreign language?

Why Spanish? A lot of people are probably learning it to gain useful skills for employment (Spanish speaking bilinguals are sought in the workforce), or to speak with the huge Spanish speaking population here. Or, in general, Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world.

Personally, I never learned Spanish in high school because I wanted to be a rebel, so I picked French. I am paying for it now, because we have a lot of Spanish resources (books, things written in two languages, bilingual phone operators and interfaces). I also live in a historically Puerto Rican neighborhood that is 53% Hispanic. I get on the bus, I want to understand conversations. I want to understand everyone in my grocery store, I want to build up the courage to buy something from the cart vendor that sells mango, corn and ice cream. I am often too shy, because I can't speak the language.

It says a lot that I am American learning languages, but haven't touched Spanish. It seems very Euro-centric to me (despite the presence of Spain). And how misguided I was! I find Spanish so beautiful now, although I can only distinguish a few accents from each other. I really adore the Spanish accent and the rhythm of a Cuban accent. However, it can be really confusing to learn the difference between them. I'm learning Italian right now, so I think I would mix it up with Spanish. It remains on my bucket list to be conquered some day.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Wow, I guess I understand you very well, but if you practically live with Hispanic people, you should learn the language, but it is not a good advice from me because here where I live you will get many people from all over the world, but most of "neighborhoods with people from abroad" are German or Italian, next to my house for example, there is a park where if you sit down there, you just will see Italian people, but that's not why i learn the language, so again, it is a bad advice from me!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/astrylian

No, it is very good advice! I agree with you! I think that's one of the biggest reasons why we learn languages - to interact with others. But, I will say that if you don't have a passion for a language, it's harder to dedicate yourself to it. I suppose it's why some people are really bad at English, despite having learned it for years in school. They know it's useful, but lack the drive!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Uhmm, it just mean you feel a passion for Italian, even you don't use it to interact with other people from where you are!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/txstbobcat
txstbobcat
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Grew up in Texas and I love vacationing in Mexico.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pseudocreobotra

I'm mostly learning Spanish for reading purposes... That's why dialects don't affect me that much. I'm currently in Spain (Barcelona) though but only for one week.

Also... I am a native speaker of a language that is estimated to have thousands of dialects just within one country (plus the ones of the other countries where it's spoken). Excluding people whose job includes public speaking (e.g. news anchors, actors etc.) very few people even speak the standard language. A mash-up of standard language and the local dialect (in varying shares) is much more common... We can't even agree on how to say the time ;)

So, Spanish is not that bad. There are dialects but I am used to plenty of dialects and their unique quirks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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I'm in Spain now too! :) My Spanish and even German are coming in quite handy! Hope you are having a good time here like I am!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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tnel1, and have you noticed how fast People from Spain speak? It's even faster than us!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Maybe people are secretly slowing down for me, but so far it seems fine. My brain is somtimes a little behind what I am hearing, but not by much at all. It is weird to say, but I almost think studying another language somehow improved things about my Spanish...almost by osmosis! :) Where are you from Kreilyn? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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I'm from Dominican Republic. I asked you because here we speak very fast. I've been talking with foreigns who speak English for example, and they are learning Spanish: I always have to speak pretty slow with them because they never understand my normal Spanish!.

Note. Dominican Spanish is pretty influenced by the one from Spain, strangely, we still have relations with them. the Christoper Columbus factor is present today!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Ah, I see! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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All of the mentioned above is actually part of the richness of our language! most of 400 million people couldn't speak exactly in the same way... We contribute all of our social and cultural background: all of the Indigenous (Mayan, Aymara, Wayuu, etc.), African, European (not just Spanish, also French, Italian, or German, for example), Arabic (recent immigrations to Latin America and the 7 or 8 centuries of domain in Iberian Peninsula), Gypsy and Japanese influences, among others. This is something that we should be proud of! :)

And about of usted, tú and vos; in the Dominican Rep you use tú and rarely usted, right? In Colombia is really messed up, because we use tú, vos and usted (in informal situations) depending on the region you come from, and sometimes you really don't know which "you" you should use.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Hi AlejoPF, in Dominican Republic is more like in the standard way, we use "tú" when talking to our friends and "usted" with older people and to be formal. If you turn on the TV you will listen to TV presenters and other people from that circle to use only "USTED"!

I have many friend from Colombia, and sometimes they use "USTED" with me (I'm just a teenager) and I feel quite old and bizarre, but I know it's one of the most Colombian sign you have to keep in mind if you want to be like them, lol!

It's like in Brazil, they use "Você" and not "Tu", but in Portugal, it is like in my country, "tu" is informal and "você" is formal, even you will listen many people to use "você" instead!

Personally i use "usted", but not because it is not for making a difference, i'm just pretty polite!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suespanishlesson

Hi, for myself I am learning so that when I go to live in Spain I am in with a fighting chance of being understood. A lot of the differences with specifics I think (hope) wont have such an impact in a conversation. Plus to be fair an awful lot of Spanish people do speak English so hopefully if wont be too hard to get by.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LastChance_15

Because Spanish is one of the languages most spoken around the world, besides Mandarin. Hope this helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Uhmm, i think so!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Draven1209
Draven1209
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Cool, it's really true, I am from Dominican Republic

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelvin5473
kelvin5473
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People from the carribean like Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico don't "destroy" the language, the reason we speak like we do is because of immigration from the canary islands and southern spain. the s is actually aspirated so it technically is pronounced and ive never heard of the r not being pronounced. Some people in puerto rico might pronounce some of the R's like an L but i dont think that classifies as destoying a language. Also the aspirated S is more common than you would think as its found all around the carribean, spain, and chile.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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You are right, most of time, when we try to pronounce the R (but not me) it's always like an L Where are you from kelvin?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelvin5473
kelvin5473
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I'm from Puerto Rico

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Uhmm, I'm Dominican, rsrsrs, and as far as I know our single difference in pronunciation is in the R, we also pronounce it like that or drop it out, but you only pronounce it (most of the time) mainly with verbs, The pronunciation of a L with verbs only happen in Santo Domingo:

•comer= comel

•correr= correl

•escribir= escribil

If i'm wrong, please correct me neighbor!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelvin5473
kelvin5473
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Yea it tends to be pronounced like an L at the end of verbs like the ones you listed. There are also people in some parts of puerto rico that pronounce the RR or the R in front of a letter like the french R. So words like rico and arroz have a guttural sound to them. Do dominicans pronounce all their R's like L's? I have dominican friends but I speak to them in english so im not sure.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Kelvin, It depends on the province you are, Most of people I know pronounce it like an L most of the time!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nic_yy

Spanish is a common language and learning it will let you be able to communicate with a lot of people.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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I am from Germany, but started studying Spanish in a US high school, later attended some evening classes in Germany. The only Spanish-speakung country I've been to is SPAIN, actually. I didn't find the Spanish spoken there very different from what I had been taught.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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I suppose it is very difficult for you... while I was learning German,for every mistake, if your you had hit me today I would not have face.

Also, as far as I know, Germany is one of the country with the largest number of Spanish students!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonniseBlo

I moved to Spain in January, so that's why I am learning Spanish. Was never a apart of my plan yet here I am.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HawaiianHonu

I have two reasons want to learn this beautiful language, the first one has already been stated, that it is a language used in a lot of places, and learning the basics could open up more doors socially for me. And also because I'm attempting to get work as a water sports apprentice on one of the Balearic Islands. Spanish isn't necessary for the job, as it will be mostly English tourists I'd work with, but considering I'd be living there for a few months as part of the job, I would love to learn the language so I could possibly communicate better in different areas. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Wow, I know the Balearic Islands are one of the most interesting tourist destinations in Spain, but... Shouldn't you learn Catalan to communicate there?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morgunnmac

I travel all over Latin America. In the next month I will visit 8 countries in South and Central America. So it seems reasonable to learn some Spanish! I take classes, use duolingo, rosetta stone and other things...all to study and learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z4CH3B99

I am most comfortable in the Mexican dialect of Spanish. It's the dialect of Spanish that I grew up with. I have a friend from Nicaragua and a friend from Venezuela; and even though they are speaking Spanish I have a hard time understanding them because of their accents.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snowfire9

Because Spanish is fun!!!!!!!!!!!!! :) :) :) Also, a lot of people speak it, so it can be really useful if you live somewhere in the south of the US or any Spanish speaking places.

3 years ago