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  5. "Jeg har det kjedelig."

"Jeg har det kjedelig."

Translation:I am bored.

June 28, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinHarry

What's the word-for-word translation of this in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berniebud

"I have it boring"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winteroc

Although it sounded strange, that is exactly what I typed xD (and of course I got it wrong)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LCA1979

Wondering whether you could say 'Jeg er kjedelig' - as in written English - I am bored?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thunderborn

I'm not a native speaker so I might be wrong, but I think that would mean 'I am boring'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LCA1979

Takk! That makes sense now :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jagitzes

It's similar to saying goodbye in Norwegian. They literally say "have it good" - "ha det bra"

Only here it's "I have it boring" to mean "I am bored"

I think it's just an idiom we need to memorize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7bubble7

You usually people would say jeg kjeder meg (im boring myself)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kurourii

I'm Dad. Glad to meet you, Bored.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sep780

In my experience, it's "Hi bored. I'm Al." I only got that kind of thing from my mom's uncle Al.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily_Phoenix

Finding 'kjedelig' really difficult to pronounce for some reason. Anyone got any helpful tips in that regard?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronzdragon

She(d) - de - li(ve) - g(ust). Start with the 'she' from shed. Then de, which is 'the' without the H. Then the first two letters of live, and then the round g, like in gust.

Might be easier if you break it up like this: kje-de-lig.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kasturi.kulal

'g' is silent here. It should be pronounced as kje-de-li (without g)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kebukebu

Try saying it maybe like "hyed-li", and press the tongue tight against the top of the mouth while pronouncing the "y". (That's English 'y'. Norsk 'j'.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minolyn

I've only heard it a couple of times, but it sounds roughly like 'shed-li".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexfrancis1991

This seems similar to spanish where they might say "tengo hambre" as in I have hunger instead of I am hungry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yus_Foxie

I spanish you can say "estoy hambriento" (I'm hungry) but it's not usual at least in Argentina..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fran45605

Since the thing I often hear is "jeg kjeder meg", I took a wild shot by translating this as "I am getting bored", but according to duolingo I got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teddybear71

"Jeg kjeder meg" is definitely a popular phrase and should be correct, if it hasn't already been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxlisaaa_

I have the bores


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shano01

Does this work like how you say I am good -> "Jeg har det bra."? Should you use this kind of sentence when speaking about how you feel or what your condition is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/forkMe

wait! I am confused, how does this sentence even construct, and treated as normal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

It is an expression. They say literally (I have it boring.) "Jeg har det kjedelig." while we say "I am bored." You cannot translate expressions word for word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HiImASpaceRock

I am going to use THIS alot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raditzu

what about "I find it boring"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sep780

Why is this not "Jeg er (word for bored)?"

Off topic, why don't Norwegian keyboards have [ and ], or are they hiding on me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moongrovenly

If you're using Windows, open the built-in "onscreen keyboard" app to see where they would be. Should be something similar on Mac and Linux too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiny_Twinkletoes

I think my memory aid for this will be akin to the French "I have heat" or "I have cold" for their English equivalents of "I am hot" and "I am cold." I'm guessing there are many more fun Norwegian "I have...." situations ahead. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebtile

Are there any other states of being that are rendered in this construction? (i.e., "I have it ", rather than "I am ")

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