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  5. "Vi har på oss klær."

"Vi har oss klær."

Translation:We are wearing clothes.

June 29, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AutumnWine

I think "we are dressed" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Added. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrs240472

Can I say "jeg har klær på"? Like in danish without the "on ME"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McMustard

So if "Vi har klær på oss" and "Vi har på oss klær" are both correct, what would be more common? (This particular sentence is probably not a great example, since if such a sentence needs stating, it's probably extraordinary circumstances.) If it's about emphasis, which part is emphasized in each version?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonathan606349

At least in Swedish, my understanding is that the two constructions are basically identical. You can put a little more emphasis on the subject or the article of clothing depending on the word order, but really it's not anything to worry about. I'm assuming that Norwegian is similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sgtluax

Is Har på the only way to say that someone is "wearing" something?

Or is there a verb that accomplishes this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feeble_weakling

Possibly "å bære"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VioletaVeer

å bære = to carry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr_McFly

Why is oss before clothes? Never understood this...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaturdayplaceTom

."Jeg/Du/Vi" - I (am)/You (are)/ We (are) "har på..." - (somebody is) wearing "...meg/seg/oss" - (I) am/(You) are/(We) are

Du har på seg ... - You are wearing ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

It is related to "har på" rather than clothes so it means we are wearing"literally we have on us".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ondtogviltonsket

I was wondering... There is this construction "haben auf" in German that it would basically be the same "har på" - One sentence used here on duolingo - Haben Sie am Sonntag auf?? (Are you open on Sunday?). Assuming that Norwegian has undergone somewhat influence from the former. Can har på mean that as well? I mean if it is used with no reflexive particle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 292

You'd need the adjective as well: "Har dere åpent på søndag?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike_Lasagna1

How would you ask "what are you wearing?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glossboss

Jeg foreslår: "Hva har du på deg?" / "Hva har dere på dere?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary_Kotka

"Dere på dere" sounds funny. I believe the Swedes have a saying: "tårta på tårta", meaning "a bit too much" (redundancy), e.g. if someone would wax his car twice in a row or there were too many different foods on the dinner table. "Tårta på tårta" is literally: "Cake on cake."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/forkMe

Is it sentence meaning "We have on our dresses" as well?

I still don't understand the grammar of wearing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

No, it's about [having on/wearing] clothes in general, which can also be expressed as "being dressed" in English.

"A dress" translates to "en kjole".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CameoKirby

why wouldn't you use "pa seg" here? "We have on ourself clothes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

The reflexive pronoun needs to agree with the subject.

jeg - meg
du - deg
han/hun/det/den - seg

vi - oss
dere - dere
de - seg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cecilence

When to use oss and when to use vårt? I'm confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beerzoe

oss = us

vårt = our


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiQvcy

I don't understand why a phrase like this is introduced completely out of the blue. Are we supposed to just guess? That's happened in a few exercises

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