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"Mi hijo siempre ha sido muy independiente."

Translation:My son has always been very independent.

2
4 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

Ha sido....what is the infinitive there? I can't remember sido at all.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skittlzz
skittlzz
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The infinitive is ser

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

Ah, thank you. That did come to me later. I really need an intensive lesson on ser and estar.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skittlzz
skittlzz
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No problem :) I always get confused on ser and estar no matter how many times I review!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EAI1
EAI1
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It is true, Spanish is my native language and still causes problems ( ser o estar ) at passive or active speech declines

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raven15

Hijo can be child or boy, right?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipReese

No, boy or child is niño. Son is hijo.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

"My son always has been"...or "My son has always been"...both should be correct. Why is that not so? This is acceptable in general speech and splitting the verb? Is that some rule in English that nobody follows? It's a matter of emphasis and style, I always thought.

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The general rule for English seems to be that adverbs (except "not") generally come right before the verb if there's only one verb in the sentence, otherwise it comes after:

  • He never saw it coming.
  • He has never seen it coming.
  • He could never have seen it coming.

It's an awkward mix of the Germanic way of handling adverbs (after the conjugated verb) and the Romance way (before the conjugated verb). And the rule doesn't account for the aforementioned "not", which tends to create its own auxiliary (He did not see it coming), and not for forms of "to be" (He was always independent/He always was independent). English is a mess and your sentence sounds fine as well, so why not?

1
Reply4 months ago