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"Bu ev oldukça küçük."

Translation:This house is quite small.

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ilknr1
ilknr1
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Is there a difference between quite and pretty? Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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In everyday spoken communication, I don't know that many English speakers put much thought to the nuances in meaning between these two words. However, I have been taught that one's speech/communication is always much clearer when, given a choice of words, you choose the one that has fewer meanings and therefore has less room for ambiguity. "Pretty" can also be an adjective that is synonymous with "beautiful." "Quite," on the other hand is always an adverb (in American English) and its first definition listed (which indicates the meaning most closely associated with the word) is

"completely, wholly, or entirely"

(http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/quite?s=t)

or

"to the utmost or most absolute extent or degree; absolutely; completely"

(http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/quite)

But for a more thorough analysis of what these two words actually convey (along with some other similar words), I highly recommend reading the post at the following link:

http://www.learnersdictionary.com/qa/pretty-fairly-really-very-and-quite

It was written by Jane Mairs, who has some impressive English credentials, from both a linguistic and teaching perspective.

Ms. Mairs also does some videos. Here is one on English conversation skills: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0K_4wGpMQgo. Your English seems pretty good, so you might find it too basic, but I recommend sticking with it for the full 18+ minutes. It covers some subtleties you might not get in a regular English conversation class.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilknr1
ilknr1
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Thx so much. I need more practise so i will watch the videos you sent. I can read and write in some extent but speaking seems to me as a huge monster :) Thanks for your help again.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Glad I could be of some help. I think speaking is probably the largest, most significant component of fluency in a foreign language. It is one thing to be able to recall words and phrases on a computer screen and completely another to try to speak in a foreign language without any visual cues other than the ones you can envision in your head. Like a lot of other things in life, it just takes practice and before you know it, those aspects of the language that once seemed so difficult will become easy ... natural ... fluent. Best wishes to you in your studies.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MilanaRus

That's a very good explanation, thanks a lot :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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The two seem to me to be synonymous and I am a native speaker. There may be a slight different, but both are used and are common.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quattrostelle

I would say that quite is a bit stronger than pretty. "This food is quite good" is a stronger compliment than "this food is pretty good".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rolandcassar

To my ear, pretty is slightly stronger than quite, and it is often tinged with faint misgivings. If you find a hotel room "quite small", it can be to your liking. If you find it "pretty small", you probably expected something bigger. That's my feeling anyway. But don't fret, they are practically synonymous.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AboAyman3

Why is "deffenitly" wrong?

2 weeks ago