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"He kisses his girlfriend in the forest."

Translation:Li kisas sian koramikinon en la arbaro.

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Steviebabes
Steviebabes
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Shouldn't it be "Li kisas lian koramikon..."? Unless we're to assume she's not his own girlfriend but some other girl's girlfriend?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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lian would imply some other boy's girlfriend, ŝian some girl's girlfriend, and sian his own girlfriend.

Were you confusing sian with ŝian, perhaps?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steviebabes
Steviebabes
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Ah yes. Thanks for the explanation mizinamo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicSal294966

I definitely was

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimnice
jimnicePlus
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is this also a double-entendre in Esperanto as it is in English?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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I've heard it called "bush" in English but not "forest".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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With the exception of maybe the Guns 'N Roses song "Welcome to the Jungle".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuxClaridge

The seventies, man...

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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I am afraid I do not know why he is kissing HIS girlfriend is not lian rather than sian.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Because she is his own girlfriend and not some other man's girlfriend.

Remember that if the subject is third person (he, she, it, they) and the object belongs to the subject, you use sia.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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What, then, does the Esperanto word "sia" mean?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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There's no one-word equivalent in English -- you can translate it as "his own, her own, its own, their own" depending on the subject, or often simply as "his, her, its, their", as context will usually imply that it's the subject's own possession in English.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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Thank you for the clarification. I had wondered if it was like English 'own' or French 'propre'. In both those languages, to be certain what one meant, we would say 'his own' or 'sa propre'. I wondered if sia was own/propre but without the pronoun. I understand the one word implies both the pronoun + own.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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I do not know why but I do not have the option of "Reply" under your most recent post. Do you mean that if he is kissing his own girlfriend and not another guy's we could say here, "Li kisas lian propran koramikinon ..." or is "propra" not appropriate here?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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There is also a word propra which is like French propre so you can also talk about, say, Mi havas mian propran libron "I have my own book" (and don't need to share one / don't need to borrow one).

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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"Reply" links disappear once a discussion is nested too many levels deep.

lian propran koramikinon would indicate that it's not the subject's own girlfriend but some other male's own girlfriend.

For something belonging to a third-person subject, you would still need sia -- so you could theoretically use sian propran koramikinon.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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"lian propran koramikinon would indicate that it's not the subject's own girlfriend but some other male's own girlfriend." Why? I am confused. Based on your example about the book I understood propra to mean it is mine and not someone else's consequently if I kissed propran koramikinon I would be kissing MY girlfriend and not my next door neighbour's girlfriend.

"so you could theoretically use sian propran koramikinon." Would that be too much? Like saying his own own girlfriend.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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"my own book" is mia propra libro.

"your own book" is via propra libro

So the propra just indicates "own" but not "whose own" it is -- mine or yours or the subject's or some other person's.

Mi kisas propran koramikinon would mean something like "I kiss an own girlfriend" (without saying whether it's my own or your own or ...).

> "so you could theoretically use sian propran koramikinon." Would that be too much? Like saying his own own girlfriend.

I think it would be like saying "I kiss my own girlfriend" -- a bit redundant because "my" already says that it belongs to "I" and nobody else, and similarly sia says that it belongs to the subject and nobody else. I'm not sure whether I'd say it's "too much"; it can give a certain emphasis in some situations. But it's not needed for clarity so if the emphasis is not needed then I suppose it's too much.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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"So the propra just indicates "own" but not "whose own" Could the problem be our interpretation of the English? If I said I have my own book that would mean, to me, the book his mine. I struggle to see how it can be both mine but also somebody else's book at the same time.

9 months ago