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  5. "Man kan leie en leiebil."

"Man kan leie en leiebil."

Translation:One can rent a rental car.

July 3, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

I didn't dare to try it, but based on a previous sentence this could theoretically mean "One can hold hands with a rental car"? Is that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Theoretically, yes, but since rental cars with hands are in such short supply we won't be accepting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Somehow I suspected that was the case... thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Is the government planning on increasing the supply?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

You should ask the chicken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelac68

Jeg håper at du ikke vil si denne kyllingen heter Erna...;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p8c

i am fuzzy on the "man kan" part.... i am wondering how it means "you can" again... what am i forgetting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxLang3

In English and in this context, the word "you" is interchangeable with "one." "You can fly a plane to Norway" vs "One can fly a plane to Norway." In both sentences, you're saying that an individual, in general, has the capability to fly on a plane to Norway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p8c

ah! thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StYkg9hq

Is there a reason "hold hands with" and "rent" are the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hectorlqr

'-bil" as in automo(bil)e?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, it's short for "automobil".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/integra0

Ah you call that a rent-a-mobile...

I thought it was Car.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan.schmi3

Isn't that a little redundant? Why not just "man kan leie en bil"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

That wouldn't teach us the word for a hire car.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddie_Werewolf

"Man" is you or one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

It's a kind of unspecified generic person. We use both "you" and "one" this way in English - "you can rent a rental car" could mean either that you specifically could do it right now, or it can just be a general statement that it's possible to do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SigurdS

In icelandic "leigubíll" means taxi (rental car is bílaleigubíll) - what would be the word for that in norwegian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Taxi" or "drosje", both masculine and in frequent use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uchecosmos

Why not "du kan leie en leiebil"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cato361808

Man is you in a general context, like "one" - One can rent a rental car.

Du is you in the direct case, if you're adressing someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stef252114

When do you use Menn or Man?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Menn" (men) is the indefinite plural of "en mann" (a man).

"Man" (one, you) is a generic or indefinite pronoun. It doesn't point to a specific person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

So, if "leie" can mean "to hold hands", could a "leiebil" also be a "holding hands car"? Not that it makes any sense at all, just wondering...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SallyByrne1

see top of this thread


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deanne145274

Could one say " one can hire a rental car?" It sounds better than repeating rent/rental


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickeymops

I had this before in your other language course, I guess "rental car" is American English and "car rental" is British English, so "car rental" should be accepted as what else could it mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

The rental car would be the vehicle marked as rented or hired car and the car rental would mean either the service provider owning the fleet and hiring out or renting out the cars through various agencies, or simply a description of the kind of service provided. Does that make sense both ways?

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