"Mia onklino estas afabla, ne stranga."

Translation:My aunt is nice, not strange.

July 3, 2015

30 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kokiri85

Stranguloj povas esti afablaj....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Ĉu ĉi tiu frazo implicas ke ne?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Ne, ĉi tiu frazo nur diras, ke tiu onklino ne estas stranga, kaj neniel implicas, ke stranguloj ne povas esti afablaj.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faust.twi

in this case it would be "my aunt is nice and not strange" right now it's like "my aunt is nice and that's why she is not strange". next phrases work same way as this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Ohh, yea, in those sentences it's more obvious. I think there are several ways to interpret this sentence, as in the other sentence you quoted it is obvious that ‘being tall’ and ‘being short’ are mutually exclusive. This isn't necessarily implied by the sentence itself, but rather by the properties used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Hmm, I see your point, but it's not quite so clear in this sentence, hence I don't quite agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faust.twi

next phrases in this exercise. has same construction. like " he is tall, not short"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FatherLuna

What if your aunt is strangely nice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Tiam via onklino estus strange afabla.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Merrowmic

malnormala = strange?

malstranga = normal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

I wouldn't really consider the opposite to "strange" to be "normal", but rather "unremarkable", "banal"…
And is the opposite of "normal" not "abnormal" ☺?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Slo

Here's a question - which language does afabla come from? Maybe "affectionate" (English) + "aimable" (French for kind/loving)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

English has the word affable, which comes from the Latin affābilis. So I presume that afable comes from Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Slo

Dankon por la respondon! Mi pensas, ke mi ankaux devus studi la anglan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Nedankinde! Fakte, mi ne konis la anglan vorton; mi trovis tion en Wiktionary ;).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DidierLois

French also has “affable”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjjosenaldo

And Portuguese has afável


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noisytoot

Stranga estas afabla!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n.gratton

Kial ne ambaû?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hodges.wt

Sed stranga ne estas malafabla ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardThor2

'Mia onklino estas afabla, ne strangas.' Kial ne?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

Du kialoj:

Unua, uzi adjektivojn kiel verbojn ĝenerale ne estas bona ideo (kaj ne havas saman signifon: "strangi" estas "elradii strangeco", ne simple "esti stranga").

Dua, estas iomete strange (;p), tiel miksi adjektivo kaj verbo, ĉu ne? ☺

sfuspvwf npj


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P3ripatetic

Has 'afabla' come to be meaningless in Esperanto, in the same way that 'nice' has in English? 'Afabla' seems to convey 'affable' (as mentioned above), which is more specific than the generic, non-descript, 'nice'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

No, it has not become meaningless at all!
It is also narrower than the word nice. It is only used in relation to a person's quality (afabla homo), or something that indirectly conveys said quality (afabla rideto, afabla donaco, ktp).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P3ripatetic

Thank you for your reply. It is good to hear some languages retain their precision.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joffysloffy

Haha, yes, indeed! And you are welcome :)

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