https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chilvence

'Dummy' Incubator?

I'm sorry if this question has been asked elsewhere, I've been combing the latest threads though and didn't find it. What I would like to ask is, even though I think I would not be able to contribute to the incubator courses, I am still curious about how it all works behind the scenes. Is there a possibility of having an open 'dummy' language incubator for people to poke around with, without worrying about the consequences? Or of being able to look behind the scenes in a non interactive 'spectator' mode?

I know, I know, why would anyone want this you ask. I'm just strange that way :)

October 11, 2013

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeelOfShame

I like the idea of a 'read only' portal into the incubator, if only to also allow interested parties to perhaps offer up suggestions of what they might find useful. The kind of "You know, I'd love to know how to use conditional clauses and I don't see it yet..." kind of thing.

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pece

I would like this too. It would be interesting to see how other incubators of different languages are going, how they are working on their language trees, whether they are encountering similar issues etc. We can be like visiting delegates hehe.

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chilvence

I actually just like knowing how things work in general, but I also think that there could be a possibility of more people being able to contribute to the courses than just a select few hand picked experts. For one thing, people could 'dry run' through the courses to flesh out the database of alternative, unconventional and incorrect responses one could give. It only needs to be dutifully 'marked' so to speak, the course author shouldn't have to be working out every possible translation. I might just be making that argument because I feel left out of all the fun, but I think it is worth considering.

But then I could be well off the mark about how it works, hence the curiosity :)

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goran12

I consider applying for Czech to English course after the end of current initial peak of applications. Now I think I shouldn't apply, but seeing how others do it would be excellent motivation to accept this challenge (and a good know-how, so that I can avoid at least some of others' mistakes, and exploit their good ideas).

October 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sigmacharding

Great idea! Would love to see this in action

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tylrmurphy

I would like to make this happen—both to give people a feel for what the process is like before applying to contribute, and also to see what kind of absurd language course is made when everybody has permission to edit it.

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chilvence

A crowdsourced conlang maybe? Stranger things could happen...

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eva.lyus

english - klingon ^^

October 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zach1337

I think he means an entirely new conlang that people would collaboratively create.

October 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chilvence

That is indeed exactly what I meant. Sorry, I only have two settings, it's either 'waffle on for hours' or 'mumble a short incoherent statement'

I actually find the idea quite fascinating. National languages all have heavy burden of conservatism to carry around with them, making it very difficult to influence them in any way. French can't tolerate any Anglicisms because it affects the purity of the language. Even though a rather noticeable chunk of standard English is derived from French. And even though French is basically Latin, as heard spoken badly by Germans ;P. But if you remove the political and cultural blinkers, I suspect a lot of people would be quite open to the idea of inventing new ways of talking, even if it were to be purely academic and auxiliary - sort of like the spoken language equivalent of the international phonetic alphabet.

The idea is obviously a popular one, if you measure it by the unlikely success of languages like Esperanto and Interlingua, which manage to propagate despite having no 'native country' to promote them, and no concrete advantage to be gained from studying them. Although I admire the initiative and the spirit behind things like that, I think if those constructed languages would have been conceived in today's world of instant and limitless communication, unlimited access to knowledge, of relative open-mindedness and connectedness between people, of inquisitiveness into foreign cultures, and of much stronger and more well known research into the genealogy of ancient languages and the origins of modern ones, they could have been much more ... considered... for want of a better word.

Oder?

October 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chiderah6th

cool

October 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amuzulo

You should call it Duoish. :)

October 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Well call me strange too. I would love to be able to participate but don't have sufficient second language skills. Still just being able to view the process is something I look forward to.

October 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0liwia

Let's make it banana language (The minions' language.)

October 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B.K.Sean

be serious

October 7, 2014
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