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https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos

Music Listening Comprehension Troubles

Luis_Domingos
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Hallo iedereen!

I'm starting my proper immersion in Dutch culture by reading newspapers and listening to Dutch language music.

On one of these forays into Dutch music, I bumped into Eefje de Visser's albums and I was instantly hooked, and I'm trying to listen to a few songs together with the lyrics to get a feel of the language and its sounds. That said, I'm having some trouble understanding some of her pronunciation choices and I'd like some assistance from more trained ears about the pronunciation of certain words.

For example, in this live recording of her song "Ongeveer", it seems like she pronounces "zijn" (around 0:58) with a sound closer to the English "eye" instead of what "ij" should sound like (weirdly enough, I hear it properly on "rij" and "bewijzen" later in the song), and I really don't understand how "zuiden" (1:26) would sound the way it does here - is she stretching the vowels to fit the song structure?

Thank you in advance for helping me out :) Dank je wel!

3 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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She hardly pronounces the n in that zijn, since the next word is verschillend it's quite normal not to pronounce it very clearly, but she drops it even more than most people will in that case. The ij in the word sounds like a normal Dutch ij sound to me, not like English "eye".

Zuiden indeed turns into something like zuihuiden which is what people sometimes do when they stretch the ui sound in songs or chants (to avoid a long pure ui which sounds kinda odd). Don't worry about it, when people won't do that in normal speech.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
Luis_Domingos
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Thanks for the careful and thorough response - I really appreciate it! Dank u wel!

Is there some kind of rule regarding that n-drop? Is there any kind of sounds or words that might trigger it (you seem to point that the use of verschillend afterwards has something to do with it)? Also - last question, I promise - How does it compare with the use of "z'n", where it's the "ij" sound that's contracted?

Thank you so much for your help :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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You're welcome. :)

There is no rule, it's just what people do depending on how difficult it is to pronounce certain subsequent sounds, usually to make the sentence flow a bit better/smoother. I guess this is very similar to other languages. I've never thought about which sounds trigger dropping other ones, I would have to say them out loud. But I guess it's mostly consonants, sounds like p, t and r seem to break the flow if they directly follow an n that is fully pronounced.

In z'n, m'n and d'r (zijn, mijn and haar) there is no vowel sound. Also the n in the first two is not pronounced very clearly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
Luis_Domingos
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Thanks again - that makes perfect sense :)

3 years ago