"The conflict lasts thirty years."

Translation:Le conflit dure trente ans.

3 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

"Le conflit dure trente années" is also accepted. I kind of thought it would be preferred, but what do I know?

Edit: Well, I now know that directly following a number, the preferred term is "ans". http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/a/an-annee-jour-journee-matin-matinee-soir-soiree.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VioletteNoire
VioletteNoire
  • 25
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Can it also be with 'pendant'? « Le conflit dure pendant trente ans. » ??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cadilhac

Not really; durer already has that sense, so it is redundant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VioletteNoire
VioletteNoire
  • 25
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Thank you! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroMinazzato

can't you squeeze trente ans in trent'ans? Is it grammatically incorrect in french?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
  • 15
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4

The northern tendancy not to pronounce the final 'e' at all is favoured over the southern one to do so (with similar words and I assume trente is included), as a result, it's not the same as j'ai for example where you're dropping the schwa from je.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

If you are asking if it is correct to drop the "e" from the end of "trente" and replace it with an apostrophe, no, I don't believe so. Note that there would be no difference in pronunciation between the two phrases (except perhaps in a song or poem), so there is no reason to make that change anyhow.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 22
  • 18
  • 1853

LOL, I'm studying both French and Italian on Duo, so I recognize that you're asking that question because that's how it's done in Italian. But no, not allowed, as others have pointed out.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 6
  • 804

I'm doing French as a brush-up from high school and college, and started with studying Italian and Spanish at the same time. I don't think there's any elision in Spanish, not even for articles and prepositions, so remembering all three is interesting - kind of a graduated scale of contractions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angomb

Is the "l" silent in conflit

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 10

I would not chance eating thirty-year-old confit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

Hahaha

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

No....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gori16

Would it be correct to say "Le conflit reste trente ans"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I doubt it. I am not aware of "rester" being used to mean "to last". To me, your sentence means, "The conflict remains 30 years"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluerose569852

How come conflit is masculine? How could anyone possibly know what gender a word is?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM
  1. It just is.
  2. You have to learn them. I always advise learning nouns with their gender attached : not "boat = bateau" but "a boat = un bateau" "a flower" = "une fleur", etc.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

My struggle exactly. I am tempted to start a movement to do away with gender in another life...lead a movement...so I could live in france and eat such amazing spinach at Chez Luis.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kocmohabt99

This is a really strange sentence in english. I would appreciate it if somebody would further explain what the french sentence is trying to get at more precisely in order to find a more appropriate translation for this sentence, since this one doesn't seem to cut if for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8

In French a simple present can be used as a "historical present" in biographies or history narratives. It adds a lively tone to the story.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 6
  • 804

I've watched a fair number of documentaries about warfare, and often the historians who are talking about/discussing/narrating drop into the present tense when addressing any particular span of time. It puts them in the moment, I think. For example, talking about the battle of Gettysburg:

"The fight lasts three days. When Lee cannot drive the Union army from its hilltop positions, he decides that General Pickett's division will mount a full frontal assault on the center of the Union line. It is a decision that Lee regrets for the rest of his life. Pickett's men are slaughtered, the unit of some 10,000 men is utterly decimated. It is the beginning of the end for the Southern cause. It assures the re-election of Abraham Lincoln, the end of slavery, and the end of the Confederacy."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leslie483050

Which historian wrote this and from which documentary is the above quote taken?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 22
  • 18
  • 1853

Not sure what you find strange about it. The use of the present tense rather than past? I can imagine telling history in the present tense: The United States invades Canada and the conflict lasts thirty years.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LorenTracy
LorenTracy
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5

As a French person, the sentence we would use would be "le conflit dure depuis trente ans". Not using "depuis" to indicate an amount of time in present tense is just weird and not done as far as my 26 yo self know

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8

No, this is not the intended meaning. "Le conflit dure depuis 30 ans" back translates to "the conflict has been lasting for 30 years.

The present tense used here is the historical present used in biographies, for instance.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoAngel663543

"Le conflit demeure trente ans." Marked wrong

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8

"demeurer" = to dwell, to stay, to inhabit.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoAngel663543

J'ai compris maintenant. Merci.

C'est un faux-ami avec un mot portugais, le verbe "demorar".

5 months ago
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.