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  5. "Jeg svømmer over Den engelsk…

"Jeg svømmer over Den engelske kanal."

Translation:I am swimming across the English Channel.

July 7, 2015

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

Usually we don't include "over" in this - either "across" or no preposition, in my recollection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Yes, it's usually transitive like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArankaBloemberg

so 'jeg svømmer Den engelske kanal' conveys the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

No, you need the preposition in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Why is "den" capitalized here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Because 'Den engelske kanal' is a proper noun here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

But you only capitalize the article, and not the noun itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, in proper place names that consist of more than one word, we only capitalize the first word. In this case it happens to be the definite article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Thank you. [Tweaking my hard wiring to make sure I got that this time.] ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iwc2ufan

Efficient :) I like it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

Is that why there is no dobbelbestemning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes. You'll see this with a lot of proper nouns, particularly the ones that entered the language back when the Danish influence was stronger. "Det hvite hus", "Den europeiske union", "De forente stater", "Den norske kirke"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fugleunge

In which cases do I need only one article? I mean, does the rule deal only with special objects (such as organizations/countries in your examples)? Are there any other cases/examples?

Kanskje stiller jeg spørsmålet på en unkorrekt måte. Jeg vil gjerne vite nå man trenger bare en artikkel (den, det, de), ikke ending (-en, -etm -ene).

Det eneste jeg har sett er eksempler med organisasjonens/lands navn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's generally limited to proper nouns, which is why you're seeing countries and organizations. Book and film titles are often affected, statues and buildings with names can be too: "Den tredje mann", "Det hvite hus".

In formal/academic language you'll sometimes see the definite ending being dropped even for regular nouns, but that's not something I'd recommend experimenting with as a learner, nor is it something we accept in this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

What is "dobbelbestemning"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnGardne7

My guess: bestemning something twice. For example, (1) Jenta liker en gutt (ubestemt); (2) Gutten liker jenta (bestemt); (3) Jenta liker ikke den andre gutten (dobbelbestemt).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, it's when we use the determinatives "det/den/de" essentially as definite articles, and then double up by adding the definite suffix as well. You'll see it referred to as "dobbeltbestemmelse" and "dobbel bestemthet".

dobbel bestemthet

det at et substantiv med etterhengt bestemt artikkel også bestemmes av determinativ (adjektivartikkel eller demonstrativ); dobbeltbestemmelse; overbestemthet

i frasen «den gamle bilen» uttrykkes dobbelt bestemthet ved determinativet «den» og suffikset «-en»


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babbeloergosum

Det er en drømm for mange mennesker ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brevskrivning

Hvorfor ikke kanalen her?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

Because it's a proper noun (ie, a specific name) and the normal rules don't apply (see also Deliciae's examples above: "Det hvite hus", "Den europeiske union", "De forente stater").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

Doesn't sound Vikingh at all

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