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  5. "Hon kysser sin man."

"Hon kysser sin man."

Translation:She kisses her husband.

July 7, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarsonC

I'm really struggling with the pronunciation of kysser. Could someone help me out?


[deactivated user]

    The way i say it is SHU-Ser but that may be incorrect


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    A little, yes. The y vowel here is pronounced the same way it would be in "byng", if that was an English word. Apart from that, sh is a decent approximation and the rest is fine. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilenuca_mare

    is there a difference between 'kyssa' and 'pussa'? ty


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    There's some overlap, but kyssa is usually a lot more intimate - like a kiss between two lovers - whereas pussa can range from that to a quick peck on the cheek.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaAtwater

    Doesn't sin mean "her own?" As opposed to some other "her"'s husband? It does not accept that as an answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Super-Svensk

    Yes, sin does mean "her" as opposed to someone else's, but the best direct translation is still "her." If you wanted to strictly say "her own husband", you could use egen, which means "own."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wcs900

    I would say Hennes man. It seems more correct with my viewpoint on husband and wife.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    That means she kisses some other female's husband. You have very straight viewpoints on marriage. :p


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wcs900

    HAHA. Well, the system accepted that answer. I guess i found your easter egg. p.s. i Just leveled up to level 10.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Yeah, since "her" translates to both in Swedish we do need to accept both - which is not exactly brilliant, pedagogy-wise, but what can we do...


    [deactivated user]

      sounds like it is innocuous if a woman kisses someone else's hubby. :) Isn't it? :D


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      You are right, but there's a subtle difference. sin doesn't really mean exactly "her own", that would be sin egen. Rather, it means that she kisses "her" husband, and that "her" happens to mean herself.

      We just usually shorten it down to "her own" for pedagogical reasons, and they mostly do mean the exact same thing - but Duolingo likes to not mix phrases that are semantically equivalent yet mean slightly different things. I'll leave it to the admins to decide whether that's appropriate here. One could well argue either way.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ezupo1

      what is the difference between man and make, is the former a more colloquial word? .Does it happen the same with fru? Can fru be replaced by kvinna? Han kysser sin kvinna.

      In Spanish from Spain one can say ...Él es mi marido (or esposo) ...He is my husband ..... but ... Él es mi hombre... He is my man .. sounds more like a home girl would say .

      But on the other hand, if we are talking about a woman, one can say......Ella es mi esposa (used less frequently and mainly by old people) or... Ella es mi mujer (she is my woman) that is the way we use most of the time.

      In summary, the normal way in Spanish is..... Mi marido and mi mujer (lit. my husband, my woman) , and this is the formula that the priest say in a wedding----I now pronounce you marido and mujer.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      A make is always a husband, and it's the more formal term. A man can be either a husband or just a man in general, but if you say min man, people will always assume you mean your spouse.

      However, for women, kvinna is always woman in general, and saying min kvinna usually just sounds sexist. The terms for wife are fru, hustru, and maka, in order from most informal to most formal.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ezupo1

      thanks again, but min man sounds sexist too, don´t you think so?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Not really, actually - since man can mean "husband" and you wouldn't use it to mean "man" in that context, it really doesn't sound sexist in Swedish.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ezupo1

      it doesn´t so in Swedish for Svenkar , it happens the same in Spanish, since mujer is both woman and wife. But if you observe it from a foreign perspective, both min man as mi mujer may sound sexist, not for me, personally, but for nowadays "sensibilities".

      un saludo, cuenta conmigo si tienes alguna duda con tu español.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Gracias. :)

      Sure, but I thought the question was how it sounds to natives, not to foreigners. :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JYH6UtXB

      Can you give examples of the situations/circumstances that fru, hustru and maka would be used in? I imagine 'maka' might be on government forms where a person indicates marital status, or similar (?).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Any kind of formal circumstance, really, though maka is only ever used in e.g. the situation you describe, whereas hustru can feasibly be used otherwise as well.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ezupo1

      _Do you, Richard Ernesto Gassko, take Deborah Julie Thompson as your lawful wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in health and in sickness ........? _Yes, no...yes, no...yes, no......


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MAM3166

      ohh boy I wouldn't be in anybody shoes if he says "hennes" instead of "sin"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppo17

      i tranaslated, by mistake, "his man", several times. Is it grammatically correct?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Yes, but it's not a translation of the phrase.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppo17

      oh! I saw the lesson now. I do understand now this reflexive form. sorry to bother you


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppo17

      Trouble is... In my mother language it doesn't even exist the difference "his/her".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mary_inkheart

      What is your mother language? Just wondering c:

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