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  5. "Hun jobber hardt for pengene…

"Hun jobber hardt for pengene."

Translation:She works hard for the money.

July 8, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

So hard for it, honey.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kfdurham

"Og du bedre behandle henne rett!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeckyFalb

I've often wondered how many times they were listening to songs on the radio when certain sentences come up. I still laugh about "det regner menn"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teddybear71

One of those sentences that can just start me singing! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SleepingPills

so you better treat her right!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akush2

Why 'hardt'? What is it referring to that uses the neutral gender?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's functioning as an adverb, modifying "jobber". The adverb form is identical to what you know as the neuter singular adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darla466508

Could "arbeider" be used in place of jobber? Do they have seperate meanings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinL396857

My understanding is that jobber is more about an occupation or profession while arbeider is akin to physical labor. I suppose it could be both if your job entails physical labor, e.g. construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OppiFjellet

you sure? We've seen "arbeider" used for someone who works in a cafe in a previous lesson... I'm not sure that counts as physical labor...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinL396857

Nope, not sure exactly but that is how I have understood native speakers explain the two terms. Also, it seems that arbeide is a somewhat outdated, less common term for work but still valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspenLever

They are interchangeable and depending where in Norway you are, one or the other is more commonly used like pop versus soda.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

Donna Summer!

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