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  5. "Vil dere prøve fisken?"

"Vil dere prøve fisken?"

Translation:Do you want to try the fish?

July 9, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

Prøve seems to have a t at the end in isolation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zpHi3R

And it's still there one year later! Y'all must be super busy, reporting it in case it wasn't before :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

We can't change the audio, it's sourced from Ivona.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amin663889

No connection between you and Ivona?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan.schmi3

Are prøve and forsøke interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Not exactly. Prøve has more of a "test" connotation, and "forsøke" is more like "attempt."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jk.nelson

Nei takk, jeg er vegetarianer (I'm only writing this to practice, did I get it right, anyone? :))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

Yes, that'll work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewOgi1

why is å absent in front of prøve?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

The infinitive marker is omitted after modal auxiliary verbs such as "vil/kan/bør/skal".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tutkin

Sorry if the question is silly, but why "dere" and not just "du"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

"Dere" is the plural "you", so this sentence would be targeted at more than one person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinNark

Prøve is similar to german "proben" with that same meaning. So its not hard to choose "prøve" or "forsøke"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dauddaud

"proben" in German is "to rehearse". "Die Proben (plural of "Die Probe)" would be "trial" or "sample". I think what you mean is "probieren" which does indeed have the same meaning as prøve.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rynji

In Dutch we have "proeven" which sounds very similar to "prøven". Proeven means to taste; but prøven has more meanings than just taste?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

The main meaning of "å prøve" is "to try/attempt", with "å smake" being the dedicated verb for "to taste". In the above sentence, you could use either of the two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

Well if you offer those I will show you these:

To try -in Dutch- could be either 'proberen' or 'uitproberen'. Attempt would be like the Dutch 'proberen': attempting to ride a bike. When planning to invite friends for dinner in a fish restaurant, you should better try the quality of the dishes first through 'uitproberen'. So I would suggest that å prøve falls more in line with 'uitproberen'. Ikke sant?

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