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Is Spanish Diverse?

I know that in English, we have words like horrifying, disgusting, repulsing, atrocious, etc. to describe the same meaning. I've come across a few if those in Spanish, but not that many. Could a few people tell me some examples and IF there actually are any? Thanks!

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/J.R.Nogal
J.R.Nogal
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Cat: Gato, felino, minino, bicho, micifuz, morrongo, morroño, etc.
Dog: perro, can, chucho, tuso, cachorro, canecillo, caniche, etc.
Horse: Caballo, corcel, bridon, garañón, jamelgo, potro, cuaco, rocin, penco, troton, percheron, etc.
Hole: Hoyo, agujero, hueco, grieta, orificio, hendidura, etc,
Fool: Tonto, menso, idiota, tarado, cretino, baboso, imbécil, etc.
Donkey: Asno, burro, pollino, borrico, jumento, rucio, onagro, etc.
Mule: Mula, macho, macha, acémila, etc.
Pig: Cerdo, puerco, marrano, cochino, gorrino, coche, chancho, cocho, cuino, verraco, etc.
Ignoramus: Ignorante, iletrado, analfabeta, palurdo, etc.
Fast: Rápido, veloz, expedito, apresurado, aligerado, precipitado, etc.
Slow: Lento, despacio, pachorrudo, pausado, sosegado, calmoso, etc.
Thief: Ladrón, ratero, bandido, caco, asaltante, conejo-ponedor, etc.
Forest: Bosque, floresta, selva, jungla, espesura, vergel, boscaje, frondosidad, etc.
Husband: Esposo, marido, conyuge, viejo, compañero, pareja, consorte, etc.
Wife: Esposa, mujer, conyuge, vieja, compañera, consorte, costilla, media-naranja, pareja, , etc.
Chili: Chile, ají, pimiento, guindilla, etc.
Banana: Platano, banana, banano, guineo, etc.
Peanut: Cacahuete, cacahuete, maní, etc.
Shoes: Zapatos, calzado, escarpines, zapatillas, cacles, chanclas, chanclos, borceguies, zuecos, cholas, alpargatas, etc.
Owl: Buho, tecolote, mochuelo, lechuza, etc.
Fish: Pez, pescado, peje, etc.
Job: Trabajo, labor, oficio, ocupación, etc.
Glasses: Lentes, anteojos, antiparras, gafas, quevedos, etc.
Beans: Frijoles, Frejoles, judias, porotos, habichuelas, alubias, etc.
Sweet Potato: Camote, batata, boniato, moniato, etc.
Zucchini: Calabaza, calabacita, zuquini. etc.
Dish: Plato, platillo, vianda, guiso, manjar, etc.
Cow: Vaca, bovino, res, becerra, ternera, vaquilla, etc.
Liar: Mentiroso, mitomano, argüendero, perjuro, embustero, engañoso, mendaz, farsante, embaucador, etc.
Naughty: Travieso, maldoso, maloso, pícaro, desobediente, etc.
Gossipmonger: Chismoso, cotilla, correveidile, intrigante, cizañero, etc.
Beautiful: Bello, hermoso, preciso, primoroso, bonito, lindo, divino, etc.
Ugly: Feo, horrible, espantoso, horroroso, repugnante, repelente, repulsivo, poco agraciado, adefesio, etc.
Computer: Computador, ordenador, pece, maquina, etc.
Car: Automóvil, auto, coche, carro, vehículo, automotor, carcacha, bólido, nave, haiga, etc.
Pen: Pluma, bolígrafo, estilográfica, pluma-fuente,etc.
Newspaper: Diario, periódico, gaceta, extra, boletín, informativo, rotativo, etc.
Bycicle: Bicicleta, bici, velocípedo, biciclo, etc.
Motorcycle: Motocicleta, moto, ciclomotor, motociclo, etc.
Parrot: Perico, cotorro, loro, cotorra, guacamaya, papagayo, etc.
Handsome: Guapo, hermoso, galano, galán, atractivo, agraciado, gallardo, etc.
Bathrom: Baño, toillete, tocador, sanitario, aseos, etc.
etc., etc., etc.,

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

.....thanks for the list! Here's two lingots for your time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

You know the book that in English is called Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day ? I got the Spanish translation of it. It's called Alexander Y El Día Terrible, Horrible, Espantoso, Horroroso. :) So, yes! There is richness of language. It's just that you rarely see much of it when you're learning the language to start off.

Spanish has the added diversity of having many different countries where it's the first language, so that idioms change. Something will be said one way in Mexico, another way in Spain, a third way in Argentina, and a fourth way in Puerto Rico. As one very simple example, in some places it's most common to see 'coche' for car. But in other's it's 'auto' and in others it's 'carro'. Sometimes everyone will know what you mean, even if you use the one that's not as common, but then again, sometimes they won't.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vik_toreea
Vik_toreea
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It gets a lot more diverse in literature. Just learning Spanish, you probably won't see much diversity. Carlos Ruiz Zafon uses a lot of variety with his word choice for example.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaRiha4
FaRiha4
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Have you read the books by Carlos Ruiz Zafon in Spanish?I've read one of his book in English (translated) & I liked it a lot.How are the original books?Will I be ablt to understand them being a beginner?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vik_toreea
Vik_toreea
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You will be able to understand them, yes. But they also have some vocabulary that would not be understood by a beginner. I read the English version then the Spanish. Some of the most wonderful books I have ever read. You learn so much and feel like you are in Spain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuizAPR
RuizAPR
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Since English has influences from German, French, Latin, Greek, and myriad other languages, it is naturally going to have myriad synonyms. However, Spanish has been influenced by Arabic and Latin as well, and contains many cognates with fellow Romance languages, like French, Italian, and Portuguese. Most well-known words in English have a rough Spanish equivalent. That grows with colloquial/informal words.

Ex: beautiful - bell(o/a), hermos(o/a), chul(o/a), guap(o/a), bonit(o/a), lind(o/a), fabulos(a/o), maravillos(o/a)
Ex2: great - gran, maravilloso, magnífico, genial, fabuloso, estupendo, grandioso

Noun examples:
Ex: girl - niña, chica, chava, joven, muchacha, nena (this one is kind of perverted), niñita, chiquita, jovencita, muchachita
Ex: car - coche, carro, auto, automóvil, máquina, vehículo.

Like English, though, some adjectives are more appropriate for different situations than other languages. Like for 'beautiful', the word 'chulo/chula' carries more of a feeling of 'hot', which is about as inappropriate in formal Spanish as 'hot' is in formal English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Come_unToomey

there are thousands!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

Examples?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

This reminds me of that old Steve Martin joke, "Those French, they have a different word for everything!" Your best bet would be getting a Spanish thesaurus or dictionary. Both will have many synonyms.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John325712
John325712
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But these words you gave as examples don't have the same meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ooreilly

They're close enough. I just thought of them off the top of my head. Don't judge.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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If you're looking for the exact same meaning, neither do the words given as an example by the original poster.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Beginning language instruction is, almost by definition, going to use a very simple, limited-vocabulary approach. It makes more sense, initially, to teach us one way each to say five things than five ways to say one thing, for instance.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ins26
Ins26
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I think Spanish have more words than English, at least that's what they told me, because we have lots of synonyms and specific words for everything while English has many words that mean different things each one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John325712
John325712
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I believe (or I was taught) that English has the largest vocabulary of any language. Few synonyms in English can be slotted in as replacements. For example: is bold really the same as courageous?

Did the influence of Arabic on Spanish have the same (or similar) effect as Norman French had on English?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ins26
Ins26
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I was told the same of Spanish, jajaja And yes, we have influence of other languages like Arabic and even English but most of our words come from Latin.

3 years ago