" arán roimh an gcaife."

Translation:Bread is in front of the coffee.

July 10, 2015

16 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altearius

Why is "There is bread before the coffee." incorrect here?

July 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Because the course creators didn’t anticipate that as a correct answer. Be sure to use the Report a Problem button to bring it to their attention.

July 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grf1426

Is right now

October 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Delaney1

There would have to 'an' before bread and also 'roimh' means in front of aswell. Alot of words a Gaeilge have 2 meanings

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GillianBryan

Very difficult to understand this.

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maedbhlynch

I said 'there is bread in front of the cafe.' Could that be right?

July 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Delaney1

Sorry no

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shane548067

Do you prononce the "g" that is in front on "caife"? Because when you listen it's like it is prononced, but when it's without the "g", is it prononce the same?

May 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trodaire

The "g" is pronounced in lieu of the "c" making it "gaife" in pronunciation.

June 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Delaney1

Yes. It's called a sébhú (idk if I spelled that right) i think its tge same with gate. Gate as Gaeilge is geata. But if you want to say on the gate you say ar an ngeata. Pronounced nyata

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1219

The eclipsing letter (g in this case) is called an urú.

The h that follows a consonant is called a séimhiú.

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CampNowhere

I misheard as "Tá an rón..." It'd still be a perfectly sane sentence as far as Duolingo is concerned XD

December 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TellTheSeal

Tá an rón roimh an gcaife. Gach maidin.

March 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighlandGirl

So does context determine whether 'roimh' means 'before' or 'in front of', aren't they opposites?

March 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1219

How are they opposites? If something is before me, it is obviously in front of me, not behind me.

March 31, 2019
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